immerse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin immersus, from immergō, from in + mergō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

immerse (third-person singular simple present immerses, present participle immersing, simple past and past participle immersed)

  1. (transitive) To put under the surface of a liquid; to dunk.
    Archimedes determined the volume of objects by immersing them in water.
  2. (transitive) To involve deeply
    The sculptor immersed himself in anatomic studies.
  3. (mathematics) This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2002, Kari Jormakka, Flying Dutchmen: Motion in Architecture (page 40)
      Thus, in mathematical terms a Klein bottle cannot be "embedded" but only "immersed" in three dimensions as an embedding has no self-intersections but an immersion may have them.

TranslationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

immerse (comparative more immerse, superlative most immerse)

  1. (obsolete) Immersed; buried; sunk.
    • Francis Bacon
      After a long enquiry of things immerse in matter, I interpose some object which is immateriate, or less materiate; such as this of sounds.

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

immerse f pl

  1. feminine plural of immerso

VerbEdit

immerse

  1. third-person singular past historic of immergere
  2. feminine plural past participle of immergere

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

immerse

  1. vocative masculine singular of immersus
Last modified on 11 April 2014, at 06:15