Translingual edit

Symbol edit

tum

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Tumbuka.

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /tʌm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌm

Noun edit

tum (plural tums)

  1. shortened form of tummy
    Synonym: tum-tum
    • 1918, Norman Lindsay, The Magic Pudding, Sydney: Angus and Robertson, page 18:
      For here am I without a crumb
      To satisfy a raging tum--
      O what an oversight!"
      As he was indulging in these melancholy reflexions he came round a bend in the road, and discovered two people in the very act of having lunch.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Balinese edit

Romanization edit

tum

  1. Romanization of ᬢᬸᬫ᭄

Iban edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tum

  1. an ancient jar that is large in the middle and opening, having a black surface and no design

Verb edit

tum

  1. to heat; to warm
    Tum dulu lauk chelap nya
    Heat the cold dish first
  2. to host lot of people for a long period of time
    Kami kena tum bala pengabang dua hari.
    We hosted the visitor for two days

Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Irish tummid.[2]

Verb edit

tum (present analytic tumann, future analytic tumfaidh, verbal noun tumadh, past participle tumtha) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. to dip (lower into a liquid), immerse, plunge, duck, submerge
  2. to dip (treat cattle or sheep by immersion)
  3. to dive (jump into water head-first; descend)
  4. to pitch (move so that the front of the craft goes alternatively up and down)
    Synonym: bocáil

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tum thum dtum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ tum”, in Historical Irish Corpus, 1600–1926, Royal Irish Academy
  2. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “tummaid, tu(i)mmid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading edit

Javanese edit

Romanization edit

tum

  1. Romanization of ꦠꦸꦩ꧀

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *tom, from Proto-Indo-European *tóm, accusative of *só. Cf. its feminine form Latin tam, as in tamquam. Cognate with Ancient Greek τότε (tóte).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

tum (not comparable)

  1. then, thereupon
    Tum Caecilius in horto sedet.
    Then Caecilius sits in the garden.
  2. at the time, at that time, then
    tum primumfor the first time, then at first
    • 58 BC, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico, VII, 11:
      Qui tum primum allato nuntio de oppugnatione Vellaunoduni
      Who then for the first time being delivered information about the siege of Vellaunodunum
    • between 27 and 9 BC, Livy, Ab urbe condita:
      Ea tum cura maxime intentos habebat Romanos, non ab ira tantum, quae in nullam unquam ciuitatem iustior fuit, quam quod urbs tam nobilis ac potens, sicut defectione sua traxerat aliquot populos, ita recepta inclinatura rursus animos uidebatur ad ueteris imperii respectum
      This concern in particular troubled the mindful Romans at the time, not so much because of anger, which has never been more justified against any other city, rather because a city so noble and powerful, in the same way that it had attracted the support of a number of communities by its revolt, was thought would again turn attention back towards respect for the previous government once recaptured.
  3. further on

Usage notes edit

Often coupled with cum

  1. Such that "tum x, cum y" = "then x, when y"
  2. "cum x tum y" = "not only x but also y"

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • tum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tum in Enrico Olivetti, editor (2003-2024) Dizionario Latino, Olivetti Media Communication
  • tum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • at the same moment that, precisely when: eo ipso tempore, cum; tum ipsum, cum
    • Pericles, the greatest man of his day: Pericles, quo nemo tum fuit clarior
    • Pericles, the greatest man of his day: Pericles, vir omnium, qui tum fuerunt, clarissimus
    • I was ten years old at the time: tum habebam decem annos
    • to be sound asleep: sopītum esse
    • to talk of a subject which was then the common topic of conversation: in eum sermonem incidere, qui tum fere multis erat in ore
    • a hand-to-hand engagement ensued: tum pes cum pede collatus est (Liv. 28. 2)

Middle English edit

Adjective edit

tum

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of tome (empty)

Norn edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse þumi, from Proto-Germanic *þūmô.

Noun edit

tum

  1. thumb

Old Javanese edit

Etymology edit

Unknown, probably from Proto-Mon-Khmer *t1um (to boil, to distil) (compare Thai ต้ม (dtôm, to boil), Khmer ដាំ (dam, to boil)).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tum

  1. (cooking) to cook by warping by banana leaf then steamed

Descendants edit

  • Javanese: ꦠꦸꦩ꧀ (tum)
  • Balinese: ᬢᬸᬫ᭄ (tum)

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

tum

  1. (onomatopoeia) crash (to collide with something)
    Synonym: crás

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish tummaid (dips, plunges, immerses).

Verb edit

tum (past thum, future tumaidh, verbal noun tumadh, past participle tumta)

  1. plunge, immerse, dip, duck, steep

References edit

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

tum

  1. Romanization of 𒌈 (tum)

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish tumme.

Noun edit

tum c

  1. inch; a measure of length

Usage notes edit

At least three different lengths can be intended: before 1855 it corresponded to 24.74 mm (also known as verktum); between 1855 and 1889 it was 29.69 mm (decimaltum). Today it mainly refers to imperial inches (engelsk tum), i.e. 25.40 mm.

Declension edit

Declension of tum 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tum tummen tum tummen
Genitive tums tummens tums tummens

Related terms edit

Tabasco Zoque edit

Numeral edit

tum

  1. one

References edit

  • A. G. de León G., El ayapaneco: una variante del zoqueano en Ja Chontalpa tabasquena [The Ayapaneco dialect: a variant of the Zoque language in the Chontalpa region of Tabasco]

Ternate edit

Etymology edit

From tumu, with word-final vowel deletion.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tum

  1. Alternative form of tumu (to dive, leap down from)

Conjugation edit

Conjugation of tum
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st totum fotum mitum
2nd notum nitum
3rd Masculine otum itum, yotum
Feminine motum
Neuter itum
- archaic

References edit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tum (𡉾)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Volapük edit

Numeral edit

tum

  1. hundred

Usage notes edit

This word must be preceded by a numeral for a single-digit number, so "one hundred" is expressed in Volapük as "baltum."

Derived terms edit