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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tum (plural tums)

  1. shortened form of tummy

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *tóm, accusative of *só. Confer with its feminine form Latin tam, as in cum-quam.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /tum/, [tʊ̃]
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

tum (not comparable)

  1. then, thereupon
    Tum Caecilius in horto sedet.
    Then Caecilius sits in the garden.
  2. at the time, at that time, then
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 26.1:
      Ea tum cura maxime intentos habebat Romanos, non ab ira tantum, quae in nullam unquam ciuitatem iustior fuit, quam quod urbs tam nobilis ac potens, sicut defectione sua traxerat aliquot populos, ita recepta inclinatura rursus animos uidebatur ad ueteris imperii respectum.
      This concern in particular troubled the mindful Romans at the time, not so much because of anger, which has never been more justified against any other city, rather because a city so noble and powerful, in the same way that it had attracted the support of a number of communities by its revolt, was thought would again turn attention back towards respect for the previous government once recaptured.
  3. further on
    ...tum silvis scaena coruscis... - Aeneid, Book 1, Line 164

Usage notesEdit

Often coupled with cum

  1. Such that "tum x, cum y" = "then x, when y"
  2. "cum x tum y"="not only x but also y"

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • at the same moment that, precisely when: eo ipso tempore, cum; tum ipsum, cum
    • Pericles, the greatest man of his day: Pericles, quo nemo tum fuit clarior
    • Pericles, the greatest man of his day: Pericles, vir omnium, qui tum fuerunt, clarissimus
    • I was ten years old at the time: tum habebam decem annos
    • to be sound asleep: sopītum esse
    • to talk of a subject which was then the common topic of conversation: in eum sermonem incidere, qui tum fere multis erat in ore
    • a hand-to-hand engagement ensued: tum pes cum pede collatus est (Liv. 28. 2)

NornEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þumi, from Proto-Germanic *þūmô.

NounEdit

tum

  1. thumb

NovialEdit

PronounEdit

tum

  1. accusative of tu

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish tummaid (dips, plunges, immerses).

VerbEdit

tum (past thum, future tumaidh, verbal noun tumadh, past participle tumta)

  1. plunge, immerse, dip, duck, steep

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

tum c

  1. inch; a measure of length

Usage notesEdit

At least three different lengths can be intended: before 1855 it corresponded to 24.74 mm (also known as verktum); between 1855 and 1889 it was 29.69 mm (decimaltum). Today it mainly refers to imperial inches (engelsk tum), i.e. 25.40 mm.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tum 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tum tummen tum tummen
Genitive tums tummens tums tummens

Related termsEdit


Tabasco ZoqueEdit

NumeralEdit

tum

  1. one

ReferencesEdit

  • A. G. de León G., El ayapaneco: una variante del zoqueano en Ja Chontalpa tabasquena [The Ayapaneco dialect: a variant of the Zoque language in the Chontalpa region of Tabasco]

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tum (𡉾)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

VolapükEdit

NumeralEdit

tum

  1. hundred

Usage notesEdit

This word must be preceded by a numeral for a single-digit number, so "one hundred" is expressed in Volapük as "baltum."

Derived termsEdit