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See also: Gas, gás, gaś, gãs, gås, gą̊s, gæs, gæs', gås', and Gaś

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Dutch gas, a word coined by chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont. Probably from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, chasm, void).

NounEdit

gas (countable and uncountable, plural gases or gasses)

  1. (uncountable, chemistry) Matter in a state intermediate between liquid and plasma that can be contained only if it is fully surrounded by a solid (or in a bubble of liquid) (or held together by gravitational pull); it can condense into a liquid, or can (rarely) become a solid directly.
    • 2013 July-August, Lee S. Langston, “The Adaptable Gas Turbine”, in American Scientist:
      Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo, meaning vortex, and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work.
    A lot of gas had escaped from the cylinder.
  2. (countable, chemistry) A chemical element or compound in such a state.
    The atmosphere is made up of a number of different gases.
  3. (uncountable) A flammable gaseous hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture (typically predominantly methane) used as a fuel, e.g. for cooking, heating, electricity generation or as a fuel in internal combustion engines in vehicles.
    Gas-fired power stations have largely replaced coal-burning ones.
  4. (countable) A hob on a gas cooker.
    She turned the gas on, put the potatoes on, then lit the oven.
  5. (US) Methane or other waste gases trapped in one's belly as a result of the digestive process.
    My tummy hurts so bad, I have gas.
  6. (slang) A humorous or entertaining event or person.
    He is such a gas!
  7. (baseball) A fastball.
    The closer threw him nothing but gas.
SynonymsEdit
  • (state of matter): vapor / vapour
  • (digestive process): wind, fart (when gas is released) (US, slang)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

gas (third-person singular simple present gases, present participle gassing, simple past and past participle gassed)

  1. (transitive) To kill with poisonous gas.
  2. (intransitive) To talk, chat.
    • 1899, Stephen Crane, chapter 1, in Twelve O'Clock:
      […] (it was the town's humour to be always gassing of phantom investors who were likely to come any moment and pay a thousand prices for everything) — “[…] Them rich fellers, they don't make no bad breaks with their money. […]”
    • 1955, C. S. Lewis, The Magician's Nephew, Collins, 1998, Chapter 3,
      "Well don't keep on gassing about it," said Digory.
  3. (intransitive) To emit gas.
    The battery cell was gassing.
  4. (transitive) To impregnate with gas.
    to gas lime with chlorine in the manufacture of bleaching powder
  5. (transitive) To singe, as in a gas flame, so as to remove loose fibers.
    to gas thread
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of gasoline.

NounEdit

gas (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable, US) Gasoline; a derivative of petroleum used as fuel.
  2. (US) Gas pedal.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gas (third-person singular simple present gases or gasses, present participle gassing, simple past and past participle gassed)

  1. (US) To give a vehicle more fuel in order to accelerate it.
    The cops are coming. Gas it!
  2. (US) To fill (a vehicle's fuel tank) with fuel.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Compare the slang usage of "a gas", above.

AdjectiveEdit

gas (comparative gasser, superlative gassest)

  1. (Ireland, colloquial) comical, zany; fun, amusing
    Mary's new boyfriend is a gas man.
    It was gas when the bird flew into the classroom.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch gast.

NounEdit

gas (plural gaste)

  1. guest

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch gas.

NounEdit

gas (plural gasse)

  1. gas (substance in gaseous phase)

BasqueEdit

 
Basque Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eu

NounEdit

gas

  1. gas

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

gas m (plural gasos)

  1. gas

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Coined by chemist Van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by geest (breath, vapour, spirit) or by chaos (chaos), from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, chasm, void).

NounEdit

gas n (plural gassen, diminutive gasje n)

  1. gas
  2. liquefied petroleum gas
    Synonyms: autogas, LPG
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: gas
  • English: gas
  • French: gaz
  • West Frisian: gas

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch gasse (unpaved street), from Middle High German gazze, from Old High German gazza, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ.

NounEdit

gas f (plural gassen, diminutive gasje n)

  1. unpaved street

Etymology 3Edit

See etymology on the main entry.

VerbEdit

gas

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gassen
  2. imperative of gassen

GalicianEdit

NounEdit

gas m (plural gases)

  1. gas

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Dutch gas.

NounEdit

gas n (genitive singular gass, nominative plural gös)

  1. gas (state of matter)
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French gaze.

NounEdit

gas n (genitive singular gass, no plural)

  1. gauze
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

gas

  1. gas

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

gas

  1. gas

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gas m (genitive singular gais, nominative plural gais)

  1. stalk, stem
  2. sprig, shoot, frond
  3. (figuratively) stripling; scion

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gas ghas ngas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

gas m

  1. gas (state of matter, petroleum)
  2. petrol
  3. poison gas

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

gas n (genitive gasis); third declension

  1. (physics) gas (state of matter)

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative gas gasēs
genitive gasis gasum
dative gasī gasibus
accusative gasem gasēs
ablative gase gasibus
vocative gas gasēs

ReferencesEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French gars, nominative singular form of garçon.

NounEdit

gas m (plural gas)

  1. (Jersey) chap

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gaze

NounEdit

gas m (definite singular gasen, indefinite plural gaser, definite plural gasene)

  1. gauze

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gaze

NounEdit

gas m (definite singular gasen, indefinite plural gasar, definite plural gasane)

  1. gauze

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gans, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰh₂éns.

NounEdit

gās f

  1. a goose

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gás, from Proto-Germanic *gans.

NounEdit

gās f

  1. goose

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit.

NounEdit

gas

  1. tree

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gȃs m (Cyrillic spelling га̑с)

  1. (chiefly Bosnia, Serbia or colloquial) gas (state of matter)
  2. gas (as fuel for combustion engines)
  3. (figuratively) acceleration
    • dȁti gȃs - “give gas”: accelerate
  4. gas pedal, accelerator

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • (gaseous state of matter): plȋn (Croatian)

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch gas, coined by Belgian chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont. Perhaps inspired by Middle Dutch gheest (Modern Dutch geest) "breath, vapour, spirit", or from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, chasm, void).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gas m (plural gases)

  1. gas (matter between liquid and plasma)
  2. gas (an element or compound in such a state)
  3. gas (flammable gas used for combustion)
  4. (in the plural) gas (waste gases trapped in one's belly)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gas c

  1. gas; a state of matter
  2. gas; a compound or element in such a state
  3. gas; gaseous fuels
  4. (plural only: gaser) gas; waste gas

DeclensionEdit

Declension of gas 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gas gasen gaser gaserna
Genitive gas gasens gasers gasernas

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gas

  1. Soft mutation of cas.

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch gas.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gas n

  1. gas

WestrobothnianEdit

NounEdit

gas n

  1. romping, cry (of joy)

Related termsEdit