intemperate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ temperate

AdjectiveEdit

intemperate (comparative more intemperate, superlative most intemperate)

  1. Lacking moderation, temper or control.
    intemperate language; intemperate zeal
  2. Indulging any appetite or passion to excess, especially the drinking of alcohol.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

intemperate (third-person singular simple present intemperates, present participle intemperating, simple past and past participle intemperated)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To disorder.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for intemperate in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

intemperātus +‎

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

intemperātē (not comparable)

  1. intemperately

ReferencesEdit

  • intemperate”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • intemperate”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers