intercessor

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late 15th century, from Latin intercessor,[1] from Latin intercēdō, from inter (between) + cēdō (I go) (English cede), literally “go-between”.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪntə(ɹ)ˌsɛsə(ɹ)/

NounEdit

intercessor (plural intercessors)

  1. A person who intercedes; a mediator; one who reconciles enemies, or pleads for another.
  2. A middleman, intermediary
    • 1894, James George Frazer, The Golden Bough[1]:
      Kings were revered, in many cases not merely as priests, that is, as intercessors between man and god, but as themselves gods
  3. A bishop who acts during a vacancy in a see.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2023), “intercessor”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intercessor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

intercessor m (plural intercessors, feminine intercessora)

  1. intercessor (one who intercedes)

AdjectiveEdit

intercessor (feminine intercessora, masculine plural intercessors, feminine plural intercessores)

  1. interceding (that intercedes)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

intercessor m (genitive intercessōris, feminine intercestrīx); third declension

  1. mediator, intercessor

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative intercessor intercessōrēs
Genitive intercessōris intercessōrum
Dative intercessōrī intercessōribus
Accusative intercessōrem intercessōrēs
Ablative intercessōre intercessōribus
Vocative intercessor intercessōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin intercessōrem.

PronunciationEdit

 

  • Hyphenation: in‧ter‧ces‧sor

NounEdit

intercessor m (plural intercessores, feminine intercessora, feminine plural intercessoras)

  1. intercessor (one who intercedes)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • intercessor” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.