inter

See also: inter-

Contents

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French enterrer, from Vulgar Latin *interrāre ‎(to put in earth), from in- +‎ terra ‎(earth). Cognates include Spanish/Portuguese/Galician/Catalan enterrar (“to inter, to bury”), Italian interrare (“to plant, to dig in”).

VerbEdit

inter ‎(third-person singular simple present inters, present participle interring, simple past and past participle interred)

  1. To bury in a grave.
  2. To confine, as in a prison.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inter.

PrepositionEdit

inter

  1. between
  2. among

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto inter, from English inter-, French inter-, Italian inter-, Spanish inter-, from Latin inter.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈin.ter/, /ˈin.tɛɾ/

PrepositionEdit

inter

  1. between, among
  2. (figuratively) division, exchange, reciprocity

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁enter ‎(between). Cognates include Sanskrit अन्तर् ‎(antár, between, within, into), Oscan 𐌀𐌍𐌕𐌄𐌓 ‎(anter, between), Old Irish eter ‎(between), Old High German untar ‎(between) and German unter ‎(among).

PIE adverb *h₁enter gave rise to the adjective *h₁énteros ‎(inner, what is inside), whence also Latin interior ‎(interior) and intrā ‎(inside, within).

PrepositionEdit

inter + accusative

  1. between, among
  2. during, while

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • inter” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be situate to the north-west: spectare inter occasum solis et septentriones
    • to carry some one away in one's arms: inter manus auferre aliquem
    • it is a recognised fact: inter omnes constat
    • to take common counsel: consilia inter se communicare
    • to be closely connected with each other: conexum et aptum esse inter se
    • systematic succession, concatenation: continuatio seriesque rerum, ut alia ex alia nexa et omnes inter se aptae colligataeque sint (N. D. 1. 4. 9)
    • we have agreed on this point: hoc convēnit inter nos
    • to be mutually contradictory: inter se pugnare or repugnare
    • to be considered the foremost orator: primum or principem inter oratores locum obtinere
    • the connection: sententiae inter se nexae
    • the connection of thought: ratio, qua sententiae inter se excipiunt.
    • to be in correspondence with..: litteras inter se dare et accipere
    • to hover between hope and fear: inter spem metumque suspensum animi esse
    • we are united by many mutual obligations: multa et magna inter nos officia intercedunt (Fam. 13. 65)
    • whilst drinking; at table: inter pocula
    • during dinner; at table: inter cenam, inter epulas
    • we have known each other well for several years: vetus usus inter nos intercedit
    • to exchange greetings: inter se consalutare (De Or. 2. 3. 13)
    • to shake hands with a person: dextram iungere cum aliquo, dextras inter se iungere
    • to transact, settle a matter with some one: transigere aliquid (de aliqua re) cum aliquo or inter se
    • to form a conspiracy: coniurare (inter se) de c. Gerund. or ut...
    • (the magistrates) arrange among themselves the administration of the provinces, the offical spheres of duty: provincias inter se comparant
    • to accuse a person of assassination: accusare aliquem inter sicarios (Rosc. Am. 32. 90)
  • inter” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
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