plead

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English pleden, plaiden, from Old French plaider (to plead, offer a plea), from plait, from Medieval Latin placitum (a decree, sentence, suit, plea, etc.", in Classical Latin, "an opinion, determination, prescription, order; literally, that which is pleasing, pleasure), neuter of placitus, past participle of placere (to please).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

plead (third-person singular simple present pleads, present participle pleading, simple past and past participle pled (North America, Scotland) or pleaded (England))

  1. To present an argument, especially in a legal case.
    The defendant has decided to plead not guilty.
    • Bible, Job xvi. 21
      O that one might plead for a man with God, as a man pleadeth for his neighbour!
  2. To beg, beseech, or implore.
    He pleaded with me not to leave the house.

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Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 04:11