See also: Isotope

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EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek ἴσος ‎(ísos, equal; same) and τόπος ‎(tópos, place), because the different isotopes of a chemical element always occupy the same position in the periodic table of elements. The term was coined in 1909 by Scottish doctor Margaret Todd and first used publicly on February 27, 1913 by English chemist Frederick Soddy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

isotope ‎(plural isotopes)

  1. (physics) Any of two or more forms of an element where the atoms have the same number of protons, but a different number of neutrons within their nuclei. As a consequence, atoms for the same isotope will have the same atomic number but a different mass number (atomic weight).
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Possible back-formation from isotopy.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

isotope ‎(third-person singular simple present isotopes, present participle isotoping, simple past and past participle isotoped)

  1. (topology, transitive) To define or demonstrate an isotopy of (one map with another).
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

isotope m, f ‎(plural isotopes)

  1. isotopic (relating to isotopes)

NounEdit

isotope m ‎(plural isotopes)

  1. isotope

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

isotope

  1. inflected form of isotop

LatinEdit

NounEdit

isotope

  1. vocative singular of isotopus
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