See also: Atom, atóm, àtom, and atom-

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

A stylized representation of a Lithium atom using a Rutherford model.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French atome, from Latin atomus (smallest particle), from Ancient Greek ἄτομος (atomos, indivisible), from ἀ- (a-, not) + τέμνω (temnō, I cut).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

atom (plural atoms)

  1. (now historical) The smallest medieval unit of time, equal to fifteen ninety-fourths of a second. [from 10th c.]
  2. (history of science) A hypothetical particle posited by Greek philosophers as an ultimate and indivisible component of matter. [from 15th c.]
  3. (physics, chemistry) The smallest possible amount of matter which still retains its identity as a chemical element, now known to consist of a nucleus surrounded by electrons. [from 16th c.]
    A molecule is a close combination of atoms.
    • 2013 September-October, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, American Scientist: 
      Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: [] . The evolutionary precursor of photosynthesis is still under debate, and a new study sheds light. The critical component of the photosynthetic system is the “water-oxidizing complex”, made up of manganese atoms and a calcium atom.
  4. A mote of dust in a sunbeam. [from 16th c.]
  5. The smallest, indivisible constituent part or unit of something. (Now generally interpreted as a figurative use of the physics sense, above.) [from 17th c.]
  6. A very small amount (of something immaterial); a whit. [from 17th c.]
    • 1873, Isabella Macdonald Alden (as "Pansy"), Three People, Western Tract and Book Society (1873), page 325:
      "I have hardly the faintest atom of hope," answered this honest, earnest man.
    • 1945, George Orwell, Animal Farm, chapter 1
      [] those of us who are capable of it are forced to work to the last atom of our strength
  7. (mathematics) A non-zero member of a Boolean algebra that is not a union of any other elements. [from 20th c.]
  8. (computing, programming, Lisp) An individual number or symbol, as opposed to a list. A scalar value.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

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CzechEdit

NounEdit

atom m

  1. (physics) atom

Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /atoːm/, [aˈtˢoːˀm]

NounEdit

atom n (singular definite atomet, plural indefinite atomer)

  1. atom

InflectionEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɒtom/
  • Hyphenation: atom

NounEdit

atom (plural atomok)

  1. atom

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English atom, from Old French atome, from Latin atomus, from Ancient Greek ἄτομος (atomos).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /atom/
  • Rhymes: -atom, -tom, -om

NounEdit

atom (plural atom-atom)

  1. (physics) atom (physics: smallest possible amount of matter retaining its chemical properties)

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

atom m

  1. (physics) atom

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

atom m (plural atomi)

  1. atom
DeclensionEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

àtōm m (Cyrillic spelling а̀то̄м)

  1. atom

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

atom c

  1. atom; the smallest particle to retain the properties of the element
  2. (historical) atom; the theoretically smallest possible particle

DeclensionEdit

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See alsoEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French atome.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

atom (definite accusative atomu, plural atomlar)

  1. (physics) atom

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 20:37