See also: Proton, protón, and próton

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πρῶτον (prôton), neuter of πρῶτος (prôtos, first).

(physics): Coined by New Zealand-British scientist Ernest Rutherford in 1920, in analogy with electron (1891), and with an additional intention of honoring English chemist William Prout.

(anatomy): (1893); a translation of German Anlage (fundamental thing) based on Aristotle’s phrase he prote ousia to proton.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton (plural protons)

  1. (physics) A positively charged subatomic particle forming part of the nucleus of an atom and determining the atomic number of an element, composed of two up quarks and a down quark.
    Comeronyms: neutron, electron
    Holonyms: atom, nucleus
    • 1931, C[harles] G[eorge] Crump, The Red King Dreams, 1946 - 1948, 24 Russell Square: Faber & Faber Limited, page 302:
      The dance of the electrons about the prota, each electron and each proton consisting of a series of waves occupying the whole of the limited universe and obeying the laws of nature as they pass, is known to all.
  2. (obsolete, anatomy) Synonym of primordium
    • 1898 July, “Contributed Articles”, in C[larence] L[uther] Herrick, editor, The Journal of Comparative Neurology: A Quarterly Periodical Devoted to the Comparative Study of the Nervous System, volume VIII, number 1; 2, Granville, Oh.: [] C[harles] Judson Herrick; [], pages 27 (C. L. H., []) and 32–33 (C. L. H.; G[eorge] E[llett] Coghill, []):
      It is a well authenticated fact that, in the case of section of a peripheral nerve, the nuclei of the sheath of Schwann pass to the centre of the lumen and form the protoplasmic prota of the segments of the new nerve []. From studies of the development of the olfactory organs in reptiles, as reported briefly in earlier numbers of this Journal, the writer has been abundantly convinced of the truth of Beard’s statement that the olfactory prota arise from the skin [].
    • 1898 December 28, Burt G[reen] Wilder, “Some Misapprehensions as to the Simplified Nomenclature of Anatomy”, in Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Session of the Association of American Anatomists, [], Washington, D.C.: Beresford, [], published 1899, page 23:
      This paper constituted the proton (the primordium, or ‘Anlage,’ if you prefer) of my own subsequent contributions, and likewise, so far as I knew at the time, of the simplified nomenclature in America.
    • 1899, Walter P[orter] Manton, “Menstruation—Ovulation—Development of the Ovum”, in Charles Jewett, editor, The Practice of Obstetrics, New York, N.Y.; Philadelphia, Penn.: Lea Brothers & Co., part II (Physiology of Pregnancy), pages 84, 97, 104, 111, and 112:
      a, b. Prota of primitive segments (protovertebræ). [] These soon become partially constricted off from the fore-brain, their narrow pedicles—the optic stalks—being the prota of the optic nerves. The dorsal wall of the fore-brain continues to grow forward and upward from the rest of the vesicle, and soon forms a fourth ventricle or permanent fore-brain, the proton of the cerebral hemispheres. [] By the sixth week the otocyst has been converted by a fold into two portions—a dorsal part—the utriculus, from which three projections arise, the prota of the semicircular canals (Fig. 91), and a ventral part, the sacculus, from the anterior end of which the cochlea is developed. [] These are the Müllerian ducts, the prota of the female internal organs of generation. [] The cords acquire a lumen and become the prota of the seminiferous tubules.

SynonymsEdit

  • p (symbolic)

HypernymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “proton”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

 
Afrikaans Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia af

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton (plural protone)

  1. (physics) proton

BretonEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton m (collective, plural protonennoù, singulative protonenn)

  1. (physics) protons

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton m

  1. proton

Further readingEdit

  • proton in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • proton in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton c (singular definite protonen, plural indefinite protoner)

  1. (physics) proton

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton n (plural protonen)

  1. (physics) proton

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton m (plural protons)

  1. (physics) proton

Further readingEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈproton]
  • Hyphenation: pro‧ton
  • Rhymes: -on

NounEdit

proton (plural protonok)

  1. (physics) proton (positively charged subatomic particle)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative proton protonok
accusative protont protonokat
dative protonnak protonoknak
instrumental protonnal protonokkal
causal-final protonért protonokért
translative protonná protonokká
terminative protonig protonokig
essive-formal protonként protonokként
essive-modal
inessive protonban protonokban
superessive protonon protonokon
adessive protonnál protonoknál
illative protonba protonokba
sublative protonra protonokra
allative protonhoz protonokhoz
elative protonból protonokból
delative protonról protonokról
ablative protontól protonoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
protoné protonoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
protonéi protonokéi
Possessive forms of proton
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. protonom protonjaim
2nd person sing. protonod protonjaid
3rd person sing. protonja protonjai
1st person plural protonunk protonjaink
2nd person plural protonotok protonjaitok
3rd person plural protonjuk protonjaik

Further readingEdit


IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

proton

  1. (physics) A proton.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the neuter form πρῶτον (prôton) of Ancient Greek πρῶτος (prôtos, first).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

prōton m (genitive prōtōnis); third declension

  1. (physics, New Latin) proton

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative prōton prōtōnēs
Genitive prōtōnis prōtōnum
Dative prōtōnī prōtōnibus
Accusative prōtōnem prōtōnēs
Ablative prōtōne prōtōnibus
Vocative prōton prōtōnēs

MalayEdit

NounEdit

proton (plural proton-proton, informal 1st possessive protonku, 2nd possessive protonmu, 3rd possessive protonnya)

  1. proton

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πρῶτον (prôton)

NounEdit

proton n (definite singular protonet, indefinite plural proton or protoner, definite plural protona or protonene)

  1. (physics) proton

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πρῶτον (prôton)

NounEdit

proton n (definite singular protonet, indefinite plural proton, definite plural protona)

  1. (physics) proton

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek πρῶτον (prôton).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton m inan

  1. proton

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

adjective
noun

Further readingEdit

  • proton in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • proton in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French proton

NounEdit

proton m (plural protoni)

  1. proton

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

pròtōn m (Cyrillic spelling про̀то̄н)

  1. proton

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

proton c

  1. (physics) proton

DeclensionEdit

Declension of proton 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative proton protonen protoner protonerna
Genitive protons protonens protoners protonernas

See alsoEdit