See also: jól and jöl

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened from jolly?

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

jol (plural jols)

  1. (South Africa, slang) A party.
    • 2012, Nadine Gordimer, No Time Like the Present, Bloomsbury, published 2013, page 249:
      —Oh sure, high spirits, a jol that went a bit over the top.
    • 2020 September 2, “More sex in Stellies with Eva Mazza”, in Sunday Times[1]:
      I had a jol observing the Friday mix at the Radisson RED’s Roof Bar and the engagement between the patrons, especially between the older men and younger women.

VerbEdit

jol (third-person singular simple present jols, present participle jolling or joling, simple past and past participle jolled or joled)

  1. (South Africa, slang) to party

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Low German and Middle Low German jolle (dinghy), possibly ultimately from a Proto-Germanic derivative of Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewlos (tube), see also Lithuanian aulas, Norwegian aul, Hittite [script needed] (auli-, tube-shaped organ in the neck), Albanian hollë, Latin alvus.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jol f (plural jollen, diminutive jolletje n)

  1. yawl

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 205

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse jól. Akin to English Yule.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jol f (definite singular jola, indefinite plural joler, definite plural jolene)

  1. Alternative form of jul

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

jol (nominative plural jols)

  1. waterside, beach, bank

DeclensionEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse jǫrð, from Proto-Germanic *erþō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁er-. Akin to English earth.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jol f (definite singular jola, dative joln)

  1. earth, soil, ground
  2. grave
    Far’n skal dill joln åt helgän
    The father will be buried next Sunday.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse jarða and the above noun.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jol

  1. to bury