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See also: Jolly

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English joli, jolif (merry, cheerful), from Old French joli, jolif (merry, joyful)[1] It is uncertain whether the Old French word is from Old Norse jól ("a midwinter feast, Yule", hence "fest-ive") [2], in which case, equivalent to yule +‎ -ive; or ultimately from Latin gaudeō (see etymology at joy). For the loss of final -f compare tardy, hasty, hussy, etc.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jolly (comparative jollier, superlative jolliest)

  1. Full of merriment and high spirits; jovial.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

jolly (plural jollies)

  1. (Britain, dated) A pleasure trip or excursion.
  2. (slang, dated) A marine in the English navy.
    • Rudyard Kipling
      I'm a Jolly — 'Er Majesty's Jolly — soldier an' sailor too!

AdverbEdit

jolly (comparative more jolly, superlative most jolly)

  1. (Britain, dated) very, extremely

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

jolly (third-person singular simple present jollies, present participle jollying, simple past and past participle jollied)

  1. (transitive) To amuse or divert.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • JOLLY in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, vol. 15, p. 495.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English jolly joker, an older name for the joker card in a deck of cards.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jolly m (invariable)

  1. (card games) joker
  2. wild card

See alsoEdit

Playing cards in Italian · carte da gioco (layout · text)
             
asso due tre quattro cinque sei sette
             
otto nove dieci fante donna,
regina
re jolly, joker,
matta