See also: Keres, kérés, and kereş

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *kėres (perhaps from a late Proto-Celtic *keresyā) borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Late Latin ceresia, from the neuter plural of ceresium, from Latin cerasium, from Ancient Greek κεράσιον (kerásion, cherry), from κερασός (kerasós, bird cherry). Compare Welsh ceirios, Breton kerez.

NounEdit

keres f (singulative keresen)

  1. cherries

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the same Proto-Finno-Ugric *kerä (round, turning; to turn, twist) stem as kerek, kerít, kerül + -s (frequentative verb-forming suffix). For the -s suffix, compare olvas (to read). Cognates include Finnish kierä (twisted), kiero (twisted).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈkɛrɛʃ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ke‧res
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃ

VerbEdit

keres

  1. (transitive) to look for; to seek; to search
    Synonym: kutat
  2. (transitive) to earn (to receive payment for work)

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

Expressions

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #286 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungary.
  2. ^ keres in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further readingEdit


LadinoEdit

VerbEdit

keres (Latin spelling)

  1. second-person singular present indicative of kerer