EnglishEdit

 
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A kosher McDonald's in Argentina

EtymologyEdit

From Yiddish כּשר(kosher), from Hebrew כָּשֵׁר(kashér).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kosher (comparative more kosher, superlative most kosher)

  1. (Judaism) Fit for use or consumption, in accordance with Jewish law (especially relating to food).
    Only in New York can you find a good, kosher hamburger!
    David's mother kept a kosher kitchen, with separate sets of dishes for meat and for dairy.
    In order for a suit to be kosher, it cannot contain both wool and linen together.
  2. (figuratively, by extension) In accordance with standards or usual practice.
    Is what I have done kosher with Mr. Smith?

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

kosher (not comparable)

  1. In a kosher manner; in accordance with kashrut.
    • 2020 August 20, Eliezer Brand, “ICE is forcing Muslims to eat pork. My fellow Orthodox Jews: This is our fight!”, in The Forward[1]:
      Just like eating halal is not a choice for our Muslim brothers and sisters, for us, eating kosher is not voluntary; it’s who we are and as necessary as the oxygen we need for sustenance.

VerbEdit

kosher (third-person singular simple present koshers, present participle koshering, simple past and past participle koshered)

  1. (transitive) To kasher; to prepare (for example, meat) in conformity with the requirements of the Jewish law.

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PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kosher (plural kosher, comparable)

  1. (of food) kosher (prepared in accordance with Jewish religious practices)

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kosher (plural kosheres)

  1. kosher