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See also: LaTeX, Latex, and látex

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Latex being extracted from a tree

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from New Latin latex (clear fluid which is part of a humour or bodily fluid), a later use of Latin latex (water; liquid, fluid). Potentially a borrowing from Ancient Greek λᾰ́τᾰξ (látax, drop of wine), reformed by analogy to other nouns in -ex. The semantic shift, however, from drop of wine to water is difficult to explain and may indicate that both words originated from a separate language. Perhaps from the same root as Proto-Celtic *lati- (Old Irish laith (liquid, beer), Welsh llad (beer)) or Proto-Germanic *ladjō- (Old High German letto (clay, loam), Old Norse leðja (mud, dregs)) or from a Pre-Greek language.[1][2][3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

latex (countable and uncountable, plural latices or latexes)

  1. (medicine, archaic, rare) A clear liquid believed to be a component of a humour or other bodily fluid (esp. plasma and lymph)
  2. The milky sap of several trees that coagulates on exposure to air; used to make rubber.
  3. An emulsion of rubber in water, used in adhesives and the like.
  4. (uncountable) Natural latex rubber, especially non-vulcanized rubber, such as is used in making latex gloves, latex condoms, and latex clothing.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “latex”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 329
  2. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010), “λάταξ”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), volume I, with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 837
  3. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009), “latex”, in Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from New Latin latex (clear fluid which is part of a humour or bodily fluid), a later use of Latin latex (water; liquid, fluid).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

latex m (uncountable)

  1. latex (milky sap of trees)
  2. latex (emulsion of rubber in water)

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Potentially a borrowing from Ancient Greek λᾰ́τᾰξ (látax, drop of wine), reformed by analogy to other nouns in -ex. The semantic shift, however, from drop of wine to water is difficult to explain and may indicate that both words originated from a separate language. Perhaps from the same root as Proto-Celtic *lati- (Old Irish laith (liquid, beer), Welsh llad (beer)) or Proto-Germanic *ladjō- (Old High German letto (clay, loam), Old Norse leðja (mud, dregs)) or from a Pre-Greek language.[1][2][3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

latex m (genitive laticis); third declension

  1. (Classical Latin, chiefly poetic) water
  2. (Classical Latin, chiefly poetic) liquid, fluid
  3. (Classical Latin, chiefly poetic, in the plural) springs
  4. (Classical Latin, chiefly poetic) juice, oil, milk
  5. (New Latin, medicine) A clear liquid believed to be a component of a humour or other bodily fluid (esp. plasma and lymph)
  6. (New Latin, botany) Milky liquid which exudes from a plant when cut and which coagulates on exposure to air.

DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative latex laticēs
Genitive laticis laticum
Dative laticī laticibus
Accusative laticem laticēs
Ablative latice laticibus
Vocative latex laticēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “latex”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 329
  2. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010), “λάταξ”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), volume I, with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 837
  3. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009), “latex”, in Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press