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EnglishEdit

 
Lavender.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English lavendre, from Anglo-Norman lavendre (French: lavande), from Medieval Latin lavendula, possibly from Latin lividus (bluish), but influenced by lavare (wash) due to use of lavender in washing clothes.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lavender (countable and uncountable, plural lavenders)

  1. Any of a group of European plants, genus, Lavandula, of the mint family.
  2. a pale purple colour, like that of the lavender flower.
    lavender colour:  
    web lavender colour:  

HyponymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit


See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lavender (comparative more lavender, superlative most lavender)

  1. Having a pale purple colour.
  2. (politics) Pertaining to lesbian feminism; opposing heterosexism.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

lavender (third-person singular simple present lavenders, present participle lavendering, simple past and past participle lavendered)

  1. (transitive) To decorate or perfume with lavender.
    • 1986, Katherine Gibson Fougera, With Custer's Cavalry (page 47)
      Short shafts of dying sunlight mingled with the deepening grey, lavendering the horizon, and all nature seemed to hush as though waiting to welcome the night.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French lavandiere, from Medieval Latin lavandārius.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lavənˈdeːr/, /ˈlavəndər/, /lau̯nˈdeːr/, /ˈlau̯ndər/

NounEdit

lavender (plural lavenderes)

  1. A washer; one (especially a woman) who washes clothes.
  2. (euphemistic) A woman employed in prostitution or having loose morals.
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Etymology 2Edit

From Old French lavendre.

NounEdit

lavender

  1. Alternative form of lavendre