See also: MINT

EnglishEdit

 
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Wikibooks

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: mĭnt, IPA(key): /mɪnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mynt, münet (money, coin), from Old English mynet (coin), from late Proto-West Germanic *munit, from Latin monēta (place for making coins, coined money), from the temple of Juno Moneta (named for Monēta mother of the Muses), where coins were made. Doublet of money and manat.

The verb is from the noun; Old English mynetian (to mint) is a parallel formation.

NounEdit

mint (plural mints)

  1. A building or institution where money (originally, only coins) is produced under government licence.
  2. (informal) A vast sum of money; (by extension) a large amount of something.
    Synonyms: (informal) bundle, (slang) pile, (colloquial) small fortune
    That house is worth a mint.
    It must have cost a mint to produce!
    to make a mint
  3. (figuratively) Any place regarded as a source of unlimited supply; the supply itself.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mint (third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

  1. (transitive) To reproduce (coins), usually en masse, under licence.
  2. To invent; to forge; to fabricate; to fashion.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      titles [] as may appear to be easily minted
  3. (transitive, cryptocurrencies) To create a crypto token.
    Coordinate term: mine
    • 2021 March 11, Scott Reyburn, “JPG File Sells for $69 Million, as ‘NFT Mania’ Gathers Pace”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      Beeple’s collaged JPG was made, or “minted,” in February as a “nonfungible token,” or NFT.
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mint (not comparable)

  1. (with condition) Like new.
    in mint condition
    • 2021 March 13, Erin Griffith, “From Crypto Art to Trading Cards, Investment Manias Abound”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      Trading card sales have taken off, too. The price of mint condition cards on StockX jumped to an average $775 in January from $280 a year ago.
  2. (numismatics) In near-perfect condition; uncirculated.
  3. (philately) Unused with original gum; as issued originally.
  4. (Britain, slang) Very good.
    • 2014, Holly Hagan, Not Quite a Geordie:
      And my God, what a house it was – it was mint! In all my life I had never set foot in such a beautiful place.
  5. (Britain, slang) Attractive; beautiful; handsome.
TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
A mint plant.

From Middle English mynte, from Old English minte (mint plant), from Proto-West Germanic *mintā (mint), from Latin menta, probably from a lost Mediterranean language either through Ancient Greek μίνθη (mínthē), μίνθα (míntha) or directly. Akin to Old Norse minta (mint).

NounEdit

mint (countable and uncountable, plural mints)

  1. Any plant in the genus Mentha in the family Lamiaceae, typically aromatic with square stems.
  2. The flavouring of the plant, either a sweet, a jelly or sauce.
  3. Any plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae.
  4. A green colour, like that of mint.
    mint:  
  5. A mint-flavored candy, often eaten to sweeten the smell of the breath.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mint (not comparable)

  1. Of a green colour, like that of the mint plant.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English minten, from Old English myntan (to mean, intend, purpose, determine, resolve), from Proto-West Germanic *muntijan (to think, consider), from Proto-Indo-European *men-, *mnā- (to think). Cognate with Saterland Frisian mintsje, muntsje (to aim, target), Dutch munten (to aim at, target), German Low German münten (to aim at), German münzen (to aim at), Dutch monter (cheerful, gladsome, spry), Gothic 𐌼𐌿𐌽𐍃 (muns, thought, opinion), Old English munan (to be mindful of, consider, intend). More at mind.

VerbEdit

mint (third-person singular simple present mints, present participle minting, simple past and past participle minted)

  1. (intransitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt; take aim.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)
  2. (transitive, provincial, Northern England, Scotland) To try, attempt, endeavor; to take aim at; to try to hit; to purpose.
  3. (intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To hint; suggest; insinuate.

NounEdit

mint (plural mints)

  1. (provincial, Northern England, Scotland) Intent, purpose; an attempt, try; effort, endeavor.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mint

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of minnen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of minnen

HungarianEdit

Table of Correlatives (cf. H. demonstrative adverbs)
question same every-/all no- relative some any else
this that ugyan mind(en)- se(m/n)- a- + qu. vala  akár
bár
más
who ki ő u mindenki senki aki v a b m
what mi ez az u u minden semmi ami/amely v a b m
which melyik mindegyik
mind
semelyik
egyik sem
amelyik v a b m
how hogy(an)
miként
így úgy u u mindenhogy
mindenhogyan
sehogy(an)
semmiképpen
ahogy/mint
ahogyan
v
v
a b
a b
m/m
m/m
whatlike
what kind
milyen
miféle
ilyen
efféle
olyan
afféle
u u mindenféle semmilyen
semmiféle
amilyen v
v
a b
a b
m
m/m
where hol itt ott u u mindenhol
mindenütt
sehol ahol v a b m
m
from wh. honnan innen onnan u u mindenhonnan sehonnan ahonnan v a b m
to where hova
hová
ide oda u u mindenhova
mindenhová
sehova
sehová
ahova
ahová
v
v
a b
a b
m
m
from
which way
merről erről arról u u mindenfelől semerről amerről v a b m
which way merre erre arra u u mindenfelé semerre amerre v a b m
why miért ezért azért u u mindenért semmiért amiért v a b m
how many hány ennyi annyi u u mind
az összes
sehány ahány v a b
how much mennyi semennyi amennyi v a b
what extent mennyire ennyire annyira u u (teljesen) semennyire amennyire v a b
what size mekkora ekkora akkora u u (az egész) semekkora amekkora v a b
what time mikor ekkor akkor u u mindig soha/sose(m)
sohase(m)
amikor v a b m
how long
how far
meddig eddig addig u u (végig)* semeddig ameddig v a b
*: Mindeddig/-addig mean “up until this/that point” (= egészen eddig/addig).
Csak following relative pronouns expresses “-ever”, e.g. aki csak (whoever);
is after “any” pronouns emphasizes “no matter”: akármit is (no matter what).

EtymologyEdit

Lexicalization of mi (what?) +‎ -n (case suffix) +‎ -t (locative suffix).[1]

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

mint

  1. (comparison of things with a quality present at different degrees) than
    A kastély nagyobb, mint a kutyaház.The castle is bigger than the dog-house.
    Synonyms: -nál/-nél, (dialectal) -tól/-től
  2. (comparison of things with a quality present at the same degree) as …… as
    Olyan nagy a házam, mint a tiéd.My house is as big as yours.
    Synonyms: amint, (literary) akár, (literary) akárcsak
  3. (comparison of things with some similar quality) like
    Olyan ez a ház, mint egy kastély.This house is like a castle.
    Synonyms: amint, (literary) akár, (literary) akárcsak
  4. (somewhat formal, pointing at a comparable feature at a different instance) as
    Mint mondtam, ő nem tud ma eljönni.As I said, he cannot come today.
    Synonyms: amint, ahogy, ahogyan
  5. (stating someone's capacity in a situation) as
    János mint zsűritag vett részt az eseményen.János took part in the event as a member of the jury.
    Synonyms: -ként, -képp/-képpen, -ul/-ül

Usage notesEdit

In the context of comparison, mint starts a new clause, so a comma is needed before it.

Derived termsEdit

Compound words
Expressions

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ mint in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further readingEdit

  • (most senses given above): mint in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (as): mint in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

mint

  1. Alternative form of mynte (mint (plant))

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

mint

  1. Alternative form of mynt (strike)

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

mint

  1. Alternative form of mynten

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

mint

  1. past participle of minne

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

mint

  1. past participle of mina

RomagnolEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mint f pl

  1. plural of mént

ReferencesEdit

Adelmo Masotti (1999) Vocabolario romagnolo italiano (in Italian), Zanichelli, page 370


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mint

  1. first-person singular present indicative of minți
  2. third-person singular present indicative of minți
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of minți