negative

See also: négative

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English negative, negatif, from Old French negatif, from Latin negativus (that denies, negative), from negare (to deny); see negate.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negative (comparative more negative, superlative most negative)

  1. Not positive nor neutral.
  2. (physics) Of electrical charge of an electron and related particles [from the 18th c.]
  3. (mathematics) Of a number: less than zero
    Antonym: nonnegative
  4. (linguistics, logic) Denying a proposition.
    Antonym: affirmative
  5. Damaging; undesirable; unfavourable.
    The high exchange rate will have a negative effect on our profits.
    Customers didn’t like it: feedback was mostly negative.
  6. Often used pejoratively: pessimistic; not tending to see the bright side of things.
    I don’t like to hang around him very much because he can be so negative about his petty problems.
  7. Of or relating to a photographic image in which the colours of the original, and the relations of left and right, are reversed.
  8. (chemistry) Metalloidal, nonmetallic; contrasted with positive or basic.
    The nitro group is negative.
  9. (New Age jargon, derogatory) Often preceded by emotion, energy, feeling, or thought: to be avoided, bad, difficult, disagreeable, painful, potentially damaging, unpleasant, unwanted.
    • 2009, Christopher Johns, Becoming a Reflective Practitioner, John Wiley & Sons, page 15
      Negative feelings can be worked through and their energy converted into positive energy... In crisis, normal patterns of self-organization fail, resulting in anxiety (negative energy).
    • 2011, Joe Vitale, The Key: the missing secret for attracting anything you want, Body, Mind & Spirit, [1]
      The threat of negative feelings may seem very real, but they are nothing more than mirages... Allow the unwanted feelings to evaporate and dissolve as the mirages that they are.
    • 2011, Anne Jones, Healing Negative Energies, Hachette, page 118
      If you have been badly affected by negative energy a salt bath is wonderful for clearing and cleansing yourself... Salt attracts negative energy and will draw it away from you.
  10. Characterized by the presence of features which do not support a hypothesis.
  11. (slang) HIV negative
    • quoted in 2013, William I. Johnston, HIV-Negative: How the Uninfected Are Affected by AIDS (page 145)
      We certainly told him at that time that I was negative. We talked about transmission. We told him we don't do anything that would cause me to become positive.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

negative (plural negatives)

  1. Refusal or withholding of assents; prohibition, veto [from 15th c.]
  2. (law) A right of veto.
    • 1787, Luther Martin, cited in The Constitutional Convention Of 1787: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia Of America's Founding (2005), Volume 1, page 391
      And as to the Constitutionality of laws, that point will come before the Judges in their proper official character. In this character they have a negative on the laws.
    • 1788, Alexander Hamilton, Federalist no. 68
      The qualified negative of the President differs widely from this absolute negative of the British sovereign; []
    • 1983, INS v. Chadha, Opinion of the Court
      In the convention there does not seem to have been much diversity of opinion on the subject of the propriety of giving to the president a negative on the laws.
  3. (photography) An image in which dark areas represent light ones, and the converse. [from 19th c.]
  4. (grammar) A word that indicates negation.
  5. (mathematics) A negative quantity.
  6. (weightlifting): A rep performed with weight in which the muscle begins at maximum contraction and is slowly extended; a movement performed using only the eccentric phase of muscle movement.
  7. The negative plate of a voltaic or electrolytic cell.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

negative (third-person singular simple present negatives, present participle negativing, simple past and past participle negatived)

  1. (transitive) To refuse; to veto.
    • 1887, L. T. Meade, The Palace Beautiful: A Story for Girls, Chapter XVIII, [2]
      Poppy earnestly begged to be allowed to go with Jasmine on the roof, but this the good lady negatived with horror.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 12, [3]
      And being of warm blood he had not the phlegm tacitly to negative any proposition by unresponsive inaction.
  2. (transitive) To contradict.
    • 1892, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Chapter XXXIII, [4]
      "A comely maid, that," said the other.
      "True, comely enough. But unless I make a great mistake—" And he negatived the remainder of the definition forthwith.
  3. (transitive) To disprove.
    • 1882, J. H. Riddell, "Old Mrs Jones" in The Collected Ghost Stories of Mrs. J. H. Riddell, Dover, 1977, page 192, [5]
      At one time an idea got abroad that the whole tale of her fortune had been a myth; [] but the boastings of various servants who declared they had seen her with “rolls on rolls” of banknotes [] negatived the truth of this statement.
  4. (transitive) To make ineffective; to neutralize.
    • 1918 May 9, Lytton Strachey, “[Florence Nightingale.] Chapter III”, in Eminent Victorians: Cardinal Manning, Florence Nightingale, Dr. Arnold, General Gordon (Library of English Literature; LEL 11347), London: Chatto & Windus, OCLC 920474333, page 162:
      "The War Office," said Miss Nightingale, "is a very slow office, an enormously expensive office, and one in which the Minister's intentions can be entirely negatived by all his sub-departments, and those of each of the sub-departments by every other."
    • 1959, Flavius Josephus, The Jewish War, translated by G. A. Williamson, Penguin, 1970, Chapter 5, page 98,
      Yet he made his largesse daily more lavish, as he saw the king negativing his efforts by taking care of the orphans and showing his remorse for the murder of his sons by his tenderness towards their little ones.
    • 1963 January, G. Freeman Allen, “Why B.R. are dropping high-power diesel-hydraulics”, in Modern Railways, page 25:
      While the diesel-hydraulic system has been failing to live up to its early promise, development in other directions has negatived some of the advantages which prompted its trial.

Derived termsEdit

InterjectionEdit

negative

  1. (law, signalling) An elaborate synonym for no.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negative

  1. inflection of negativ:
    1. definite attributive positive degree/superlative degree
    2. plural

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negative

  1. inflection of negativ:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negative f pl

  1. Feminine plural of adjective negativo.

NounEdit

negative f

  1. plural of negativa

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negātīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of negātīvus

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negative

  1. inflection of negativ:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negative

  1. inflection of negativ:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

negative

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of negativ.