See also: LIC, Lic, líc, lić, lîç, Lic., lic., and -lic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lic (plural lics)

  1. Abbreviation of license/licence.

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lic f

  1. (archaic, dialectal) Alternative form of leic: dative singular of leac

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lit͡s/, [lʲit͡s]

VerbEdit

lic

  1. second-person singular imperative of licyś

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *līką.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

līċ n

  1. dead body, corpse
    Ōga cwæþ þæt hē wisse hwǣr þæt līċ bebyrġed wǣre.
    Oga said he knew where the body was buried.
  2. body
  3. form

Usage notesEdit

  • Līką was the general word for "body" in Proto-Germanic (as still in Gothic), but by the time of written Old English, līċ has come to mean a dead body specifically, and the general word for "body" is līchama.
  • The older sense “body (living or dead)” is preserved in poetry and in certain compounds such as līcþēote (“pore,” literally “body pipe”). Some other compounds even preserve the yet older sense “form,” otherwise totally obsolete: eoforlīċ (“bore figure,” e.g. a boar crest on a helmet). See also the derived terms -līċModern English -ly and ġelīċlike, which both originally meant “formed” or “shaped” at some point in Proto-Germanic.

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: lich, lik
    • English: lich
    • Scots: lyke, lich

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lic

  1. genitive plural of lico

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

lic f

  1. dative of leac

SloveneEdit

NounEdit

lic

  1. genitive dual/plural of lice