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IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lecc, from Proto-Celtic *ɸlikkā, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥keh₂ (flat surface).

Celtic cognates include Welsh llech, Breton lec'h, Cornish legh, and the Gaulish toponym Are-lica. Indo-European cognates include Ancient Greek πλάξ (pláx, flat stone). Ultimately connected with PIE *pleh₂- (flat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leac f (genitive singular leice or lice, nominative plural leaca or leac(r)acha)

  1. large, flat stone; slab (paving stone); flagstone
  2. gravestone
    leac lena cheann.
    He is dead and buried.
  3. slab (flat piece of material), something slab-shaped
    leac seacláidea slab of chocolate
    Ghearr an long an coipeadh ina leaca.
    The ship cut the foam into slabs.
  4. kitty (pool of money)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *laukaz. Cognate with Old Saxon lōk (Low German Look), Dutch look, Old High German louh (German Lauch), Old Norse laukr (Danish løg, Swedish lök, Icelandic laukur).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lēac n

  1. leek

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *lěkъ, from Proto-Germanic *lēkijaz.

NounEdit

leac n (plural leacuri)

  1. medicine, remedy, cure

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lecc, from Proto-Celtic *ɸlikkā, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥keh₂ (flat surface).[1]

Celtic cognates include Welsh llech, Breton lec'h, Cornish lehan (slate, slab), and the Gaulish toponym Are-lica. Indo-European cognates include Ancient Greek πλάξ (pláx, flat stone). Ultimately connected with PIE *pleh₂- (flat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leac f (genitive lice, dative lic, plural leacan)

  1. slab (of stone)
  2. ledge (of rock)
  3. flagstone, paving stone
  4. slate (for writing on)
  5. gravestone
  6. cheek

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 134