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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lītigāre, present active infinitive of lītigō; which, in its turn, stems from lītem (a quarrel) + agō (do, practice).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

litigate (third-person singular simple present litigates, present participle litigating, simple past and past participle litigated)

  1. (intransitive, construed with on) To go to law; to carry on a lawsuit.
    • 1988, Bobby McFerrin (lyrics), “Don't Worry, Be Happy”, in Simple Pleasures, performed by Bobby McFerrin:
      Ain't got no place to lay your head / Somebody came and took your bed / Don't worry, be happy / The landlord say your rent is late / He may have to litigate
  2. (transitive) To contest in law.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


IdoEdit

VerbEdit

litigate

  1. adverbial present passive participle of litigar

ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

lītigāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of lītigātus