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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

French contester, from Old French, from Latin contestor (to call to witness)

PronunciationEdit

Noun

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒn.tɛst/
  • (US) enPR: kŏn'tĕst, IPA(key): /ˈkɑn.tɛst/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒntɛst

Verb

NounEdit

contest (countable and uncountable, plural contests)

  1. (uncountable) Controversy; debate.
    no contest
  2. (uncountable) Struggle for superiority; combat.
  3. (countable) A competition.
    The child entered the spelling contest.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

contest (third-person singular simple present contests, present participle contesting, simple past and past participle contested)

  1. (intransitive) To contend.
    I will contest for the open seat on the board.
    • Alexander Pope
      Of man, who dares in pomp with Jove contest?
    • Bishop Burnet
      The difficulty of an argument adds to the pleasure of contesting with it, when there are hopes of victory.
  2. (transitive) To call into question; to oppose.
    The rival contested the dictator's re-election because of claims of voting irregularities.
    • J. D. Morell
      Few philosophical aphorisms have been more frequently repeated, few more contested than this.
  3. (transitive) To strive earnestly to hold or maintain; to struggle to defend.
    The troops contested every inch of ground.
  4. (law) To make a subject of litigation; to defend, as a suit; to dispute or resist, as a claim, by course of law; to controvert.

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