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AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mūsica, from Ancient Greek μουσική (mousikḗ, of a Muse).

NounEdit

música f (uncountable)

  1. music (sound, organized in time in a melodious way)

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mūsica, from Ancient Greek μουσική (mousikḗ, of a Muse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

música f (plural músiques)

  1. music
  2. female equivalent of músic

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

música

  1. feminine singular of músic

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mūsica, from Ancient Greek μουσική (mousikḗ, of a Muse).

NounEdit

música f (plural músicas)

  1. music
  2. musician (female)

Related termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

música f sg

  1. feminine singular of músico

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mūsica, borrowed from Ancient Greek μουσική (mousikḗ, of a Muse), derived from Μοῦσα (Moûsa, Muse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

música f (plural músicas)

  1. music
    Que tipo de música você gosta mais?
    What kind of music do you like the most?
  2. song
    Esta música me lembra de minha infância
    This song reminds me of my childhood.
  3. female equivalent of músico

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:música.


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mūsica, from Ancient Greek μουσική (τέχνη) (mousikḗ (tékhnē), (art) of the Muses). Compare the doublet murga, which probably resulted from a semi-popular form of the word.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmusika/
  • Hyphenation: mú‧si‧ca

NounEdit

música f (plural músicas)

  1. music

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit