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See also: Song, söng, sōng, sǒng, sòng, sông, and sổng

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English song, sang, from Old English song, sang (noise, song, singing, chanting; poetry; a poem to be sung or recited, psalm, lay), from Proto-Germanic *sangwaz (singing, song), from Proto-Indo-European *sengʷʰ- (to sing). Cognate with Scots sang, song (singing, song), Saterland Frisian Song (song), West Frisian sang (song), Dutch zang (song), Low German sang (song), German Sang (singing, song), Swedish sång (song), Norwegian Bokmål sang (song), Norwegian Nynorsk song (song), Icelandic söngur (song), Ancient Greek ὀμφή (omphḗ, voice, oracle). More at sing.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

song (plural songs)

  1. A musical composition with lyrics for voice or voices, performed by singing.
    Thomas listened to his favorite song on the radio yesterday.
    • 1852, Mrs M.A. Thompson, “The Tutor's Daughter”, in Graham's American Monthly Magazine of Literature, Art, and Fashion, page 266:
      In the lightness of my heart I sang catches of songs as my horse gayly bore me along the well-remembered road.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights, [], the height and vastness of this noble fane, its antiquity and its strength—all these things seemed to have their part as causes of the thrilling emotion that accompanied his thoughts.
  2. (by extension) Any musical composition.
  3. Poetical composition; poetry; verse.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      This subject for heroic song.
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      The bard that first adorned our native tongue / Tuned to his British lyre this ancient song.
  4. The act or art of singing.
  5. A melodious sound made by a bird, insect, whale or other animal.
    I love hearing the song of canary birds.
  6. (ornithology) The distinctive sound that a male bird utters to attract a mate or to protect his territory; contrasts with call
  7. Something that cost only a little; chiefly in for a song.
    He bought that car for a song.
    • Benjamin Silliman (1779–1864)
      The soldier's pay is a song.
    • 1915, Mrs. Belloc Lowndes, The Lodger, chapter I:
      Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; [].
  8. An object of derision; a laughing stock.
    • Bible, Job xxx. 9
      And now am I their song, yea, I am their byword.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


ChuukeseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

song

  1. angry

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English song.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

song m (plural songs)

  1. song

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sæing (bed), later sæng.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

song f (genitive singular songar or seingjar, plural seingir or sengur)

  1. bed

DeclensionEdit

Declension of song
f11 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative song songin seingir, sengur seingirnar, sengurnar
accusative song songina seingir, sengur seingirnar, sengurnar
dative song songini seingjum seingjunum
genitive seingjar, songar seingjarrinar, songarinnar seingja seingjanna

See alsoEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

song

  1. Nonstandard spelling of sōng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of sǒng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of sòng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sǫngr. Akin to English song.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

song m (definite singular songen, indefinite plural songar, definite plural songane)

  1. song
    Kven er det som syng denne songen?
    Who sings this song?

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

song

  1. past tense of syngja, syngje, synga and synge

ReferencesEdit


Tai DamEdit

Tai Dam cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : song

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tai *soːŋᴬ, from Middle Chinese (MC ʃˠʌŋ, “two”). Compare Lao ສອງ (sǭng), ᦉᦸᧂ (ṡoang), Shan သွင် (sʰɔŋ1), Thai สอง (sɔ̌ɔng).

NumeralEdit

song (transliteration needed)

  1. two

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English song.

NounEdit

song

  1. song

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from (“twin; double”)

PrefixEdit

song

  1. bi-
    song đấm
    twin punches; punches performed with both hands

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

AdverbEdit

song

  1. (formal) however

Etymology 3Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

(classifier cái) song

  1. an upright post in a paling or railing
    sau song sắt
    behind (iron) bars
Derived termsEdit

ZhuangEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tai *soːŋᴬ, from Middle Chinese (MC ʃˠʌŋ, “two”). Compare Lao ສອງ (sǭng), ᦉᦸᧂ (ṡoang), Shan သွင် (sʰɔŋ1), Thai สอง (sɔ̌ɔng).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /θoːŋ˨˦/
  • Tone numbers: song1
  • Hyphenation: song

NumeralEdit

song (old orthography soŋ, Sawndip forms /, )

  1. two
    • 2008, Rint Sybesma, Zhuang: A Tai language with some Sinitic characteristics, in From Linguistic Areas to Areal Linguistics (edited by Pieter Muysken), page 246:
      De   fwngz   ndeu   yaeuj   ndaej   song   doengj   raemx   bae!
      3s    hand    one     raise    ACQ    two    bucket    water    PRT
      S/he can lift two buckets of water with one hand!

Usage notesEdit

Used with ndeu rather than it.

SynonymsEdit