See also: Musical

English edit

 
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Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English musical, from Old French [Term?], from Medieval Latin mūsicālis, from Latin mūsica (music) +‎ -ālis (suffix forming adjectives); equivalent to music +‎ -al.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmju.zɪ.kəl/
  • (file)

Adjective edit

musical (comparative more musical, superlative most musical)

  1. Of, belonging or relating to music, or to its performance or notation.
    musical proportion
    musical instruments
  2. Pleasing to the ear; sounding agreeably; having the qualities of music; melodious; harmonious.
    She had a musical voice.
  3. Fond of music; discriminating with regard to music; gifted or skilled in music.
    having a musical ear
    The child is musical.
  4. Pertaining to a class of games in which players move while music plays, but have to take a fixed position when it stops; by extension, any situation where people repeatedly change positions.
    • 1962, Edward Albee, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?: A Play, Simon and Schuster, →ISBN, page 34:
      Musical beds is the faculty sport around here.
    • 2004, Mike Bright, A Dream Realized: A Collection of Poems by Cowboy Mike Bright, Xulon Press, →ISBN, page 341:
      Musical seats upon an airplane is not a game I recommend.
    • 2006, Evelyn Palfrey, The Price of Passion, Simon and Schuster, →ISBN, page 441:
      “Sounds like y'all are playing musical houses. How did you convince your mama to move to Austin?”
    • 2011, Leonard James Schoppa, The Evolution of Japan's Party System: Politics and Policy in an Era of Institutional Change, University of Toronto Press, →ISBN, page 14:
      Parties were splitting, forming, merging, and dissolving in such rapid succession that the game of musical chairs seemed to describe what was going on better than any known theory of political science.
    • 2014, Tyler McMahon, Kilometer 99: A Novel, St. Martin's Griffin, →ISBN, page 138:
      Among my small circle of college friends, and even more so among the volunteers here, couples are so often changing places, people playing musical lovers.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

musical (plural musicals)

  1. A stage performance, show or film that involves singing, dancing and musical numbers performed by the cast as well as acting.
    • 2004, Steven Adler, On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way, SIU Press, →ISBN, page 221:
      It is unthinkable for a straight play to enjoy a life span like those of the blockbuster musicals or to earn such astronomical grosses.
  2. (probably archaic or obsolete) A meeting or a party for a musical entertainment; a musicale.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

musical m or f (masculine and feminine plural musicals)

  1. musical

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

musical m (plural musicals)

  1. musical

Further reading edit

Danish edit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English musical.

Noun edit

musical c (singular definite musicalen, plural indefinite musicaler or musicals)

  1. A musical.

Inflection edit

Alternative forms edit

Derived terms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin mūsicālis. By surface analysis, musique +‎ -al.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

musical (feminine musicale, masculine plural musicaux, feminine plural musicales)

  1. musical

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Haitian Creole: mizikal
  • Persian: ⁧موزیکال(muzikâl)
  • Turkish: müzikal

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adjective edit

musical m or f (plural musicais)

  1. musical; of or pertaining to music
    Synonym: músico

Further reading edit

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English musical.[1]

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmjuzikɛl]
  • Hyphenation: mu‧si‧cal
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Noun edit

musical (plural musicalek)

  1. musical (a show or film which involves singing, dancing and musical numbers)

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative musical musicalek
accusative musicalt musicaleket
dative musicalnek musicaleknek
instrumental musicallel musicalekkel
causal-final musicalért musicalekért
translative musicallé musicalekké
terminative musicalig musicalekig
essive-formal musicalként musicalekként
essive-modal
inessive musicalben musicalekben
superessive musicalen musicaleken
adessive musicalnél musicaleknél
illative musicalbe musicalekbe
sublative musicalre musicalekre
allative musicalhez musicalekhez
elative musicalből musicalekből
delative musicalről musicalekről
ablative musicaltől musicalektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
musicalé musicaleké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
musicaléi musicalekéi
Possessive forms of musical
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. musicalem musicaljeim
2nd person sing. musicaled musicaljeid
3rd person sing. musicalje musicaljei
1st person plural musicalünk musicaljeink
2nd person plural musicaletek musicaljeitek
3rd person plural musicaljük musicaljeik

References edit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Interlingua edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

musical

  1. musical (relating to music)

Synonyms edit

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English musical.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

musical m (invariable)

  1. musical

References edit

  1. ^ musical in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Noun edit

musical m (definite singular musicalen, indefinite plural musicaler, definite plural musicalene)

  1. form removed by a 1982 spelling decision; superseded by musikal

Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

musical m (feminine singular musicala, masculine plural musicals, feminine plural musicalas)

  1. musical (of or relating to music)
  2. musical (pleasing to the ear)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Piedmontese edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

musical

  1. musical

Related terms edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English musical, from Middle English musical, from Old French, from Medieval Latin mūsicālis, from Latin mūsica + -ālis.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /mjuˈzi.kal/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ikal
  • Syllabification: mu‧si‧cal

Noun edit

musical m inan

  1. (film, music, theater) musical (stage performance, show or film)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjective

Further reading edit

  • musical in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • musical in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From música (music) +‎ -al (of or relating to).

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -al, (Brazil) -aw
  • Hyphenation: mu‧si‧cal

Adjective edit

musical m or f (plural musicais)

  1. musical (of or relating to music)
  2. musical (pleasing to the ear)
    Synonyms: melodioso, melódico

Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:musical.

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

musical m (plural musicais)

  1. musical (stage performance, show or film that focuses on singing and dancing)

Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:musical.

Related terms edit

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /musiˈkal/ [mu.siˈkal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: mu‧si‧cal

Adjective edit

musical m or f (masculine and feminine plural musicales)

  1. musical

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

musical m (plural musicales)

  1. musical

Related terms edit

Further reading edit