See also: Marcus

DalmatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *(a)māricōsus, from Latin amārus. Compare Spanish and Portuguese amargoso, Sardinian marigosu.

AdjectiveEdit

marcus

  1. bitter

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Late back-formation from marculus, which was interpreted as having the diminutive suffix -ulus.

NounEdit

marcus m (genitive marcī); second declension

  1. (Late Latin) large hammer, sledgehammer
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative marcus marcī
Genitive marcī marcōrum
Dative marcō marcīs
Accusative marcum marcōs
Ablative marcō marcīs
Vocative marce marcī
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Frankish *mark.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

marcus m (genitive marcī); second declension[1][2]

  1. (Medieval Latin) mark (unit of currency, measurement)
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative marcus marcī
Genitive marcī marcōrum
Dative marcō marcīs
Accusative marcum marcōs
Ablative marcō marcīs
Vocative marce marcī
DescendantsEdit
  • Old French: marc
    • Middle French: marc
  • Iberian:
  • East Iberian:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “marca”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 653
  2. ^ marcus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Frankish *marku.

NounEdit

marcus m (genitive marcī); second declension[1]

  1. (Medieval Latin) Alternative form of marca (boundary, limit)
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative marcus marcī
Genitive marcī marcōrum
Dative marcō marcīs
Accusative marcum marcōs
Ablative marcō marcīs
Vocative marce marcī
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ marcus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)