See also: matrâs

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

matras

  1. plural of matra

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch matras, from Middle Dutch matrasse, matratse, from Old French materas (modern matelas), from Italian materasso (cognate with Occitan almatrac, Spanish almadraque, Portuguese almadraque), from Arabic مَطْرَح(maṭraḥ), itself perhaps from مُطْرَح(muṭraḥ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

matras (plural matrasse)

  1. A mattress.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maːˈtrɑs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ma‧tras
  • Rhymes: -ɑs

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch matrasse, matratse, from Old French materas (modern matelas), from Italian materasso (cognate with Occitan almatrac, Spanish almadraque, Portuguese almadraque), from Arabic مَطْرَح(maṭraḥ), itself perhaps from مُطْرَح(muṭraḥ).

NounEdit

matras n or f (plural matrassen, diminutive matrasje n)

  1. A mattress (a firm pad on which a person can recline and sleep)
  2. By extension, a technical bedding or padding to protect something
  3. (slang, derogatory) A slut, harlot, a girl so easy that 'everybody does her'; sometimes extended to men who are promiscuous
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: matras
  • Indonesian: matras
  • Russian: матрас (matras)
  • Sranan Tongo: matrasi
  • West Frisian: matras

Etymology 2Edit

From French matras, from Arabic مَطَرَة(maṭara, leather bag).

NounEdit

matras m (plural matrassen, diminutive matrasje n)

  1. (obsolete) A container of several types: [18th - early 19th c]
    1. an alchemist's long-necked glass receiver
    2. a leather bag
    3. a urinal

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Provençal matrat (arrow), from Old French matras, from Latin matara, mataris, materis, madaris (Celtic javelin), a word of Celtic/Gaulish origin. Doublet of matras.

NounEdit

matras m (plural matras)

  1. a crossbow's square, with a cylindric or quadrangular head

Etymology 2Edit

From Arabic مَطَرَة(maṭara, leather bag).

NounEdit

matras m (plural matras)

  1. an alchemist's long-necked glass receiver

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • matras” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  • The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia: A Work of Universal Reference in All Departments of Knowledge with a New Atlas of the World. (1906). United States: Century Company, p. 3660

IndonesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Dutch matras.

NounEdit

matras (first-person possessive matrasku, second-person possessive matrasmu, third-person possessive matrasnya)

  1. mattress

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English matrass.

NounEdit

matras (first-person possessive matrasku, second-person possessive matrasmu, third-person possessive matrasnya)

  1. (chemistry) bolthead flask.

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

matras

  1. Alternative form of materas

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic مَطْرَح(maṭraḥ, place where something is thrown), from طَرَحَ(ṭaraḥa, to throw), perhaps via Italian materasso.

NounEdit

matras m (oblique plural matras, nominative singular matras, nominative plural matras)

  1. mattress

DescendantsEdit