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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French morgue. The second sense developed from the first, via "a prison examination room", probably with reference to the haughty attitude of the jailers.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

morgue (plural morgues)

  1. A supercilious or haughty attitude; arrogance.
    • 1855, Sir Richard Burton, Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah and Meccah, Dover 1964, p. 34:
      They being newcomers, free from the western morgue so soon caught by Oriental Europeans, were particularly civil to me, even wishing to mix me a strong draught; but I was not so fortunate with all on board.
  2. A building or room where dead bodies are kept before their proper burial or cremation, (now) particularly in legal and law enforcement contexts.
  3. The archive and background information division of a newspaper.
Kwapil, Joseph F. (2 July 1921) "Librarian Talks of Newspaper Morgue", Fourth Estate page 5.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • morgue” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɔʁɡ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

morgue f (plural morgues)

  1. morgue

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

morgue

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of morgar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of morgar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of morgar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of morgar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French morgue.

NounEdit

morgue f (plural morgues)

  1. morgue