Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian друг ‎(drug, friend), in which sense it is used in the invented slang in Anthony Burgess's dystopian novel A Clockwork Orange (1962).

NounEdit

droog ‎(plural droogs)

  1. A violent young gang member or a hooligan.

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch drōghe, from Old Dutch *drougi, *drōgi, from Proto-Germanic *draugiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerǵʰ- ‎(to strengthen; become hard or solid), from *dʰer- ‎(to hold, hold fast, support). Compare Low German dröög, German dröge ‎(dull), West Frisian droech, English dry; compare also German trocken.

AdjectiveEdit

droog ‎(comparative droger, superlative droogst)

  1. dry
  2. arid
InflectionEdit
Inflection of droog
uninflected droog
inflected droge
comparative droger
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial droog droger het droogst
het droogste
indefinite m./f. sing. droge drogere droogste
n. sing. droog droger droogste
plural droge drogere droogste
definite droge drogere droogste
partitive droogs drogers
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Non-lemma forms.

VerbEdit

droog

  1. first-person singular present indicative of drogen
  2. imperative of drogen
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