See also: Nase, naše, nãse, and наше

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From German Nase.

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

nase (plural nases or nase)

  1. Any of the genus Chondrostoma of freshwater potamodromous fishes.
    • 1885, Charles Rau, Prehistoric Fishing in Europe and North America. Archæological Researches in Nicaragua (Smithsonian contributions to knowledge; XXV), City of Washington: Smithsonian Institution, pages 45–46:
      Fish-remains.—People living upon lakes plentifully stocked with fish, it can be imagined, availed themselves of all means in their power for capturing them, and the numerous remains of fishes discovered on the sites of the ancient lacustrine villages bear witness to the extent of their efforts in that direction. Not only the bones of fishes but also their scales, the latter even in a good state of preservation, have been extracted from the lake-mud. “With respect to fishes,” says Professor Rütimeyer, “many species were found which are now the most abundant in our lakes and rivers.” The following are mentioned:—
      The salmon (Salmo salar, Lin.), the pike (Esox lucius. Lin.), the perch (Perca fluviatilis, Lin.), the carp (Cyprinus carpio, Lin.), the dace (Cyprinus leuciscus, Lin.), the chub (Cyprinus dobula, Nilss.), the nase (Chondrostoma nasus, [Lin.] Agass.), the burbot (Lita vulgaris, Jen.), and the rud (Scardinius erythrophthalmus, [Lin.] Bon.).
Derived termsEdit
For more see   Nase on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

nase (plural nases)

  1. Rare form of naze.
    • 1877, Joseph Yelloly Watson, The Tendring Hundred in the Olden Time: A Series of Sketches ..., page 134:
      Alton Park, near the sea, was the Park made by Richard de Belmeis, Bishop of London, and he enclosed with it the wood then belonging to the Canons of St. Paul, and called [it] "Edulvesnase""—so that there was evidently a "nase" or promontory on this spot.
    • 1889, Lafayette Charles Loomis, The Index Guide to Travel and Art-study in Europe: A Compendium of Geographical, Historical, and Artistic Information for the Use of Americans, page 533:
      The upper and Lower Nases, two promontories nearly dividing the lake, beyond which  []

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

nase (plural nases)

  1. Alternative spelling of naze (worthless, knackered)

Further readingEdit


GuaraníEdit

VerbEdit

nase

  1. to be born

LatinEdit

NounEdit

nāse

  1. vocative singular of nāsus

Middle High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German nasa, from Proto-Germanic *nasō, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s-.

NounEdit

nase f

  1. nose

DescendantsEdit

  • Alemannic German: Nase, Naase
  • Bavarian: Nosn
  • Central Franconian: Nas, Noas, Nos
  • East Franconian: Nous
  • German: Nase
  • Rhine Franconian: Noos
    • Pennsylvania German: Naas
  • Vilamovian: nōs, nōz
  • Yiddish: נאָז(noz)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

nase f or m (definite singular nasa or nasen, indefinite plural naser, definite plural nasene)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2005; superseded by nese

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nasar and nasir, nominative and accusative plurals of nǫs f (whence Norwegian Nynorsk nos f. The verb is derived from the noun.

NounEdit

nase m (definite singular nasen, indefinite plural nasar, definite plural nasane)

  1. (anatomy) nose (organ)
    Du har noko på nasen din.
    You've got something on your nose.
  2. nose (tip of an object)
    Nasen på flyet var dekt med snø.
    The nose of the airplane was covered in snow.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

nase (present tense nasar, past tense nasa, past participle nasa, passive infinitive nasast, present participle nasande, imperative nase/nas)

  1. to smell, sniff
    Sauen nasa på maten, men åt han ikkje.
    The sheep sniffed the food, but did not eat it.
  2. to nose (snoop)

Alternative formsEdit

  • nasa (a- and split infinitives)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


SwaziEdit

ConjunctionEdit

náse

  1. when

TarantinoEdit

NounEdit

nase

  1. nose