Abenaki

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Numeral

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nas

  1. three

Big Nambas

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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nas

  1. banana

References

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Catalan nas, from Latin nāsus, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nas m (plural nassos)

  1. nose

Usage notes

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  • In Algherese, the primary plural is nasos.

Derived terms

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References

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Galician

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Etymology 1

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From contraction of preposition en (in) + feminine plural article as (the).

Pronunciation

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Contraction

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nas f pl (masculine sg no, feminine sg na, masculine plural nos)

  1. in the

Etymology 2

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From a mutation of as.

Pronoun

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nas f (accusative)

  1. Alternative form of as (them, feminine plural)
Usage notes
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The n- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -u or a diphthong, and are suffixed to the preceding word.

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Hausa

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English nurse.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nâs m or f (plural nâs-nâs)

  1. nurse

Iban

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English nurse.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nas

  1. nurse

Ingrian

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Spatial inflection of nas
→○ illative nasse
inessive nas
○→ elative nast

Etymology

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Rebracketing of as preceded by the illative marker *-Vn.

Pronunciation

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Postposition

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nas (+ illative or allative)

  1. (of time) up to, until
  2. (of distance or motion) all the way to

nas (+ elative or ablative)

  1. (of time) ever since
  2. (of distance or motion) all the way from

Synonyms

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References

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  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 336

Latin

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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nās

  1. second-person singular present active indicative of

Lombard

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Etymology

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Akin to Italian naso, from Latin nasus.

Noun

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nas

  1. nose

Lower Sorbian

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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nas

  1. genitive/accusative/locative of my

Masurian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Polish nasz.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈnas/
  • Rhymes: -as
  • Syllabification: nas

Pronoun

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nas

  1. (possessive) first person plural possessive pronoun; our

Further reading

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  • Zofia Stamirowska (1987-2024) “nasz”, in Anna Basara, editor, Słownik gwar Ostródzkiego, Warmii i Mazur[1], volume 4, Zakład Narodowy im. Ossolińskich Wydawnictwo Polskiej Akademii Nauk, →ISBN, page 275

Megleno-Romanian

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Etymology

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From Latin nasus.

Noun

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nas

  1. nose

Northern Kurdish

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Etymology

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Ultimately derived from Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh₃- (to know).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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nas (comparative nastir, superlative herî nas or nastirîn, Arabic spelling ناس)

  1. acquainted, familiar

Derived terms

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References

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  • Chyet, Michael L. (2020) “nas”, in Ferhenga Birûskî: Kurmanji–English Dictionary (Language Series; 2), volume 2, London: Transnational Press, page 54

Northern Sami

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Pronunciation

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  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈnas/

Adverb

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nas

  1. what about

Further reading

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  • Koponen, Eino, Ruppel, Klaas, Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008), Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[2], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Piedmontese

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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nas m

  1. nose
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Polish

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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nas

  1. genitive/accusative/locative of my

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: nas

Etymology 1

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Contraction

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nas f pl

  1. Contraction of em as (in the): feminine plural of no
    • 2000, J. K. Rowling, Lia Wyler, Harry Potter e o Cálice de Fogo, Rocco, page 71:
      Gosto de sentir uma brisa saudável nas minhas partes, obrigado.
      I like to feel a healthy breeze on my parts, thank you.
Quotations
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For quotations using this term, see Citations:no.

Etymology 2

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Pronoun

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nas

  1. Alternative form of as (third-person feminine plural objective pronoun) used as an enclitic following a verb form ending in a nasal vowel or diphthong
    Façam-nas.Make them.
    Farão-nas.They will make them.
Usage notes
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  • This form is very rarely used in spoken Brazilian Portuguese, where nominative forms are preferred over third-person direct object pronouns (which, when used, are typically placed before verbs).
Quotations
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For quotations using this term, see Citations:no.

Romanian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin nāsus, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nas n (plural nasuri)

  1. nose

Declension

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Derived terms

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See also

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Romansch

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Latin nāsus, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Noun

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nas m

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) nose

Scottish Gaelic

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Etymology

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From Middle Irish níd as (a thing that is); compare Irish nios.

Pronunciation

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Particle

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nas

  1. Precedes the comparative form of an adjective or an adverb.
    glic → nas glicewise → wiser
    mòr → nas mothabig → bigger

Usage notes

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See also

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Serbo-Croatian

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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nȃs (Cyrillic spelling на̑с)

  1. of us (genitive plural of (I))
  2. us (accusative plural of (I))

Declension

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White Hmong

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Etymology

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From Proto-Hmong *naŋᴮ (mouse, rat). Related to Proto-Mien *nauᴮ (id), though the difference in rime is unexplained.[1] Probably not related to Thai หนู (nǔu, id).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nas (classifier: tus)

  1. rat
  2. (generally) rodent

Derived terms

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References

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  • Heimbach, Ernest E. (1979) White Hmong — English Dictionary[3], SEAP Publications, →ISBN, page 136.
  1. ^ Ratliff, Martha (2010) Hmong-Mien language history (Studies in Language Change; 8), Camberra, Australia: Pacific Linguistics, →ISBN, page 58; 277.