See also: NEC, néč, -nec, and n.e.c.

Contents

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin necō. Compare Daco-Romanian îneca, înec.

VerbEdit

nec (past participle nicatã)

  1. I kill.
  2. I drown.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nec(and not).

AdverbEdit

nec

  1. And not.
    Io non sape, nec vole sapere.‎ ― I don't know, and I don't want to know.
  2. Neither, nor.
    Illo nec me place nec displace.‎ ― It neither pleases me nor displeases me.
  3. And, or (following a "with no" or "without").
    Nos debe resister sin aqua nec alimento.‎ ― We must resist with no water or food.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Apocopated form of neque.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

nec ‎(not comparable)

  1. nor
  2. and not, not
  3. neither
  4. not even

SynonymsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

nec

  1. nor
  2. and not
  3. not either
  4. not even

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Asturian: nin
  • Catalan: ni
  • Dalmatian: ne
  • Fala: nin
  • French: ni
  • Galician: nin
  • Italian:
  • Middle French: ny
  • Old French: ne
  • Old Portuguese: nen
  • Portuguese: nem
  • Spanish: ni

ReferencesEdit

  • nec in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nec in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.nec”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a thing has happened contrary to my expectation: aliquid mihi nec opinanti, insperanti accidit
    • no wonder: nec mirum, minime mirum (id quidem), quid mirum?
  • Andrew L. Sihler (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, New York, Oxford, Oxford University Press