Translingual edit

Symbol edit

or

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Odia.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English or; partially contracted from other, auther, from Old English āþor, āwþer, āhwæþer ("some, any, either"; > either); and partially from Middle English oththe, from Old English oþþe, from Proto-Germanic *efþau (or).

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

or

  1. Connects at least two alternative words, phrases, clauses, sentences, etc., each of which could make a passage true.
    You may either stay or come.
    He might get cancer, or be hit by a bus, or God knows what.
  2. (logic) An operator denoting the disjunction of two propositions or truth values. There are two forms, the inclusive or and the exclusive or.
  3. Counts the elements before and after as two possibilities.
  4. Otherwise (a consequence of the condition that the previous is false).
    It's raining! Come inside or you'll catch a cold!
  5. Connects two equivalent names.
    The country Myanmar, or Burma
Usage notes edit
  • (connecting alternative terms): When not implied by the meaning of the conjoins, it is generally ambiguous whether “or” is intended in an exclusive or inclusive sense. In speech, various means may be used to convey exclusivity, such as stress on the word “or” or a rising intonation before it.[1] In a formal or technical register, and/or may be used to specify inclusivity.
Translations edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Etymology 1 (sense 2 above).

Noun edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

or (plural ors)

  1. (logic, electronics) Alternative form of OR

See also edit

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from Middle French or (yellow), from Old French or, from Latin aurum (gold). Doublet of aurum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

or (countable and uncountable, plural ors)

  1. (heraldry) The gold or yellow tincture on a coat of arms.
    • 1909, Arthur Charles Fox-Davies, A Complete Guide to Heraldry:
      The metals are gold and silver, these being termed "or" and "argent".
    • 1889, Charles Norton Elvin, A Dictionary of Heraldry:
      In engraving, "Or" is expressed by dots.
    or:  
Synonyms edit
  • (gold or yellow tincture): o., Or
Related terms edit
  • Au (chemical symbol for gold)
Translations edit

Adjective edit

or (not comparable)

  1. (heraldry) Of gold or yellow tincture on a coat of arms.
Synonyms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 4 edit

Late Old English ār, from Old Norse ár. Compare ere.

Adverb edit

or

  1. (obsolete) Early (on).
  2. (obsolete) Earlier, previously.

Preposition edit

or

  1. (now archaic or dialect) Before; ere. Followed by "ever" or "ere".
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], →OCLC, Ecclesiastes 12:6-7:
      Or euer the siluer corde be loosed, or the golden bowle be broken, or the pitcher be broken at the fountaine, or the wheele broken at the cisterne. Then shall the dust returne to the earth as it was: and the spirit shall returne vnto God who gaue it.
    • 1834, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:
      I looked to heaven, and tried to pray;
      But or ever a prayer had gusht,
      A wicked whisper came, and made
      My heart as dry as dust.
    • 1906, Lord Dunsany [i.e., Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany], Time and the Gods[2], London: William Heineman, →OCLC, page 3:
      And Time went forth into the worlds to obey the commands of the gods, yet he cast furtive glances at his masters, and the gods distrusted Time because he had known the worlds or ever the gods became.

References edit

  1. ^ Huddleston, Rodney (1988) English Grammar: An Outline, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, pages 198–99

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ōrō. Compare Daco-Romanian ura, urez.

Verb edit

or first-singular present indicative (past participle uratã)

  1. to pray

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Basque edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

1103; variant of hor, from Proto-Basque *hoŕ. Mostly replaced by zakur.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

or anim

  1. dog

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Further reading edit

  • "or" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus
  • or” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], euskaltzaindia.eus

Catalan edit

Chemical element
Au
Previous: platí (Pt)
Next: mercuri (Hg)

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin aurum, from Proto-Italic *auzom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂é-h₂us-o- (glow), from *h₂ews- (to dawn, become light, become red).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

or m (plural ors)

  1. gold
  2. (heraldry) or

Derived terms edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle French or, from Old French or, from Latin aurum, from Proto-Italic *auzom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂é-h₂us-o- (glow), from *h₂ews- (to dawn, become light, become red).

Noun edit

or m (plural ors)

  1. gold
  2. (heraldry) or (yellow in heraldry)
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Haitian Creole:
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old French ore, from Vulgar Latin horā, alteration of hāc horā ((in) this hour, ablative). Compare Spanish ahora, Portuguese agora.

Adverb edit

or

  1. (obsolete) now, presently

Conjunction edit

or

  1. yet, however, now, that said (introduces the second term in a syllogism)

Usage notes edit

This is often used to introduce contrasting information (like English however). However, the information need not be contrasting, but can simply be supplemental information that leads to a subsequent conclusion.

Further reading edit

Ido edit

Etymology edit

Borrowing from French or, Italian ora and Spanish ahora.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

or

  1. now, but (in argument)

Usage notes edit

Or expresses not only a sequence of two propositions, but induces a new argument, a further premise, explanation, motive. When the premise (motive) follows the conclusion, nam is used instead.

Italian edit

Adverb edit

or (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of ora (now), used almost exclusively in the forms or ora (just now) and or sono (ago).

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Japanese edit

Particle edit

or(オア) (oa

  1. Alternative form of オア (or)

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old English ōr, from Proto-West Germanic *ōʀ, from Proto-Germanic *ōsaz, form Proto-Indo-European *h₃éh₁os (mouth).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

or

  1. (Early Middle English, hapax) beginning, start

Etymology 2 edit

Determiner edit

or

  1. (chiefly Early Middle English and West Midland) Alternative form of here (their)

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

or

  1. Alternative form of ore (honour)

Etymology 4 edit

Noun edit

or

  1. Alternative form of ore (ore)

Etymology 5 edit

Determiner edit

or

  1. Alternative form of your

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

  • aur (alternate Latinized spelling)

Etymology edit

From Old French or.

Noun edit

or m (uncountable)

  1. gold (metal)
  2. gold (color)

Descendants edit

  • French: or
    • Haitian Creole:
  • English: or

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From Old Norse ǫlr, órir.

Noun edit

or f or m (definite singular ora or oren, indefinite plural orer, definite plural orene)

  1. an alder (tree of genus Alnus)

Synonyms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse ǫlr, órir. Akin to English alder.

Noun edit

or f (definite singular ora, indefinite plural orer, definite plural orene)

or m (definite singular oren, indefinite plural orar, definite plural orane)

  1. an alder (tree of genus Alnus)

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse ór.

Alternative forms edit

Preposition edit

or

  1. out of
  2. from
    • 1956, Olav H. Hauge, Gjer ein annan mann ei beine:
      Han kom or fjellet, skulde heim, [] .
      He came from the mountain, was heading home [] .

References edit

Old English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *ōzô, *ōsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃éh₁os (mouth).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ōr n

  1. origin, beginning

Descendants edit

  • Middle English: or (early, hapax)

References edit

Old French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin aurum.

Noun edit

or oblique singularm (oblique plural ors, nominative singular ors, nominative plural or)

  1. gold (metal)
  2. gold (color)
  3. (by extension) blond(e) color
Descendants edit
  • Middle French: or, aur
    • French: or
      • Haitian Creole:
    • English: or
  • Walloon: ôr

Etymology 2 edit

See ore.

Adverb edit

or

  1. Alternative form of ore

Old Frisian edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

ōr

  1. Old West Frisian form of ōther

References edit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

(ele/ei) or (modal auxiliary, third-person plural form of vrea, used with infinitives to form presumptive tenses)

  1. (they) might
    fiindcă or avea ceva pe care noi nu-l avem, va trebui așteptăm puțin
    being that they might have something that we don't, we will need to wait a bit

Verb edit

or (modal auxiliary, ? form of avea, used with ? to form ? tenses)

  1. (informal, sometimes proscribed) Variation of o in the third person plural.
    Or să vină într-un minut.
    They will come in a minute.

Adverb edit

or

  1. Alternative form of ori

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin aurum.

Noun edit

or m

  1. (Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) gold

Scots edit

Etymology edit

A variant of ere, obsolete in modern English.

Conjunction edit

or

  1. before or until (only in certain senses)
    It'll nae be lang or A gang ma holiday.- It'll not be long until/ before I go on holiday

Usage notes edit

Not archaic, but rare amongst young people.

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

Possibly from Old Irish amar (song, singing). See òran.

Noun edit

or m (genitive singular ora, plural ora or orthachan or orrachan or orthannan)

  1. hymn, incantation, petition, prayer

Synonyms edit

Verb edit

or (past dh’or, future oridh, verbal noun oradh, past participle orte)

  1. chant, sing
    Tha Màiri ag oradh.Mary is singing.

Swedish edit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology edit

Related to orna (moldy, spoiled by mites), Danish oret, of obscure ultimate origin. Compare oren (impure, dirty, unclean, rotten).[1]

Noun edit

or n

  1. any mite in the superfamily Acaroidea, order Astigmata

Usage notes edit

Popular as a crossword entry.

Declension edit

Declension of or 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative or oret or oren
Genitive ors orets ors orens

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ or”, in Svenska Akademiens ordbok [Dictionary of the Swedish Academy][1] (in Swedish), 1937

Anagrams edit

Tocharian A edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Indo-European *dóru, with unexplained loss of initial */d/. Compare Tocharian B or.

Noun edit

or n

  1. wood

Tocharian B edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Indo-European *dóru, with unexplained loss of initial */d/. Compare Tocharian A or.

Noun edit

or n

  1. wood

Related terms edit

Yola edit

Conjunction edit

or

  1. Alternative form of ar
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 78:
      Wich ad wough bethther kwingokee or baagchoosee vursth?
      Whether had we better churn or bake first?
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 9, page 88:
      Na, now or neveare! w' cry't t' Tommeen,
      Nay, now or never! we cry'd to Tommy,
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 11, page 88:
      Up caame ee ball, an a dap or a kewe
      Up came the ball, and a tap or a shove
    • 1867, “CASTEALE CUDDE'S LAMENTATION”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 4, page 104:
      Hea pryet ich mought na ha chicke or hen,
      He prayed I might not have chicken nor hen,

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867