EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English naught, nought, naht, nawiht, from Old English. Compare naught.

PronounEdit

nowt

  1. (Northern England) naught, nothing
SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

nowt (uncountable)

A sign to tell visitors to this retail outlet that nothing is available
  1. (Northern England, Sussex) naught, nothing

AdverbEdit

nowt (not comparable)

  1. (Northern England) naught, nothing
AntonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English, from Old Norse. Cognate with Old English nēat.

NounEdit

nowt (plural nowts)

  1. (Scotland and Northern England) An ox.
  2. (Scotland and Northern England) Herd of cattle.
  3. (figuratively, Scotland and Northern England) A dumb, crass, or clumsy person or a person who is stubborn or difficult.
    • 1929, James William Marriott editor, The Best One-act Plays of 1931[1], G.G. Harrap, published 1932, page 162:
      A hunner guineas for the heid o' that nowt Renwick, and him no' sae very far awa' frae your very nose at this meenit.

ReferencesEdit

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • nowt in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4[3]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [4]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[5]

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

nowt

  1. (South Scots) naught, nothing

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 00:42