English

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Etymology

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oblige +‎ -er

Pronunciation

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Noun

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obliger (plural obligers)

  1. One who, or that which, obliges.
    • a. 1639, Henry Wotton, a letter to Edmund Bacon
      it is the natural property of the same heart, to be a gentle Interpreter, which is so noble an Obliger

References

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Anagrams

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French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Middle French obliger, from Old French obligier, borrowed from Latin obligāre.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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obliger

  1. (transitive) to oblige, to require, to compel, to force someone (to do something: (transitive with à))
    Synonyms: contraindre, forcer
  2. (passive voice) (transitive with de) to have to
    Synonym: devoir
  3. (Louisiana) to help, to aid
    Synonym: aider

Conjugation

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This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written oblige- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a "soft" /ʒ/ and not a "hard" /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Latin

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Verb

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obliger

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of obligō

Middle French

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Etymology

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From Old French obligier, from Latin obligāre, present active infinitive of obligō.

Verb

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obliger

  1. (transitive) to oblige

Conjugation

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  • As parler except an extra e is inserted after the final g before a and o.
  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants

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  • French: obliger