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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English devoir, from French devoir, from Old French deveir, from Latin dēbēre (to owe, to be duty bound to do something).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dəˈvwɑː/
  • Hyphenation: de‧voir

NounEdit

devoir (plural devoirs)

  1. (archaic, often in plural) Duty, business; something that one must do.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French deveir, from Latin dēbēre, present active infinitive of dēbeō (to owe, to be duty bound to do something).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

devoir m (plural devoirs)

  1. duty
  2. exercise (set for homework)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

devoir

  1. must, to have to (as a requirement)
  2. must, to do or have with certainty
  3. (transitive) to owe (money, obligation and etc)
  4. (literary, intransitive, in imperfect subjunctive, with inversion of subject) (even) though it be necessary (+ infinitive)
    • 1842, George Sand, Consuelo:
      Eh bien, se dit-elle, j'irai, dussé-je affronter les dangers réels [...]. ⇒ Well, she said to herself, I'll go, even if I have to face real danger.
  5. (reflexive, ~ de) to have a duty to

Usage notesEdit

  • The past participle drops the circumflex accent in its other forms: feminine singular due; masculine plural dus; feminine plural dues.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French devoir, from Old French deveir, from Latin dēbēre (to owe, to be duty bound to do something).

NounEdit

devoir (plural devoirs)

  1. devoir
    • 1479, William Caxton, De Consolatione Philosophiæ, translated into English by Geoffrey Chaucer:
      I William Caxton have done my devoir to enprint it

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēbēre, present active infinitive of dēbeō (I owe, I am duty bound to do something).

VerbEdit

devoir

  1. (modal) to have to; must
  2. to owe

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has a stressed present stem doiv distinct from the unstressed stem dev, as well as other irregularities. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

  • The trema on the u of the past participle deü is not used by all authors.
  • The feminine forms of the past participle are more commonly spelled due and dues, though deue and deues are attested.

NounEdit

devoir m (oblique plural devoirs, nominative singular devoirs, nominative plural devoir)

  1. debt

DescendantsEdit

  • English: due (from past participle deu, deü)
  • Middle French: debvoir

ReferencesEdit

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (devoir)
  • “Appendix E: Irregular Verbs” in E. Einhorn (1974), Old French: A Concise Handbook, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-09838-6, pages 152–153