See also: AID, aïd, Aïd, Äid, and -aid

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French aide, from Old French eide, aide, from aidier, from Latin adiūtō, adiūtāre (to assist, help). Cognates include Spanish ayuda, Portuguese ajuda and Italian aiuto

NounEdit

aid (countable and uncountable, plural aids)

  1. (uncountable) Help; assistance; succor, relief.
    He came to my aid when I was foundering.
    • (Can we date this quote by Henry Hallam and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      An unconstitutional mode of obtaining aid.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0029:
      “[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  2. (countable) A helper; an assistant.
    • Bible, Tobit viii. 6
      It is not good that man should be alone; let us make unto him an aid like unto himself.
  3. (countable) Something which helps; a material source of help.
    • 1983, Richard Ellis, The Book of Sharks, Knopf, →ISBN, page 16:
      The human is so poorly designed for aquatic adventures that he cannot even see in the water without artificial aids.
    • 2013 September-October, Henry Petroski, “The Evolution of Eyeglasses”, in American Scientist:
      The ability of a segment of a glass sphere to magnify whatever is placed before it was known around the year 1000, when the spherical segment was called a reading stone []. Scribes, illuminators, and scholars held such stones directly over manuscript pages as an aid in seeing what was being written, drawn, or read.
    Slimming aids include dietary supplements and appetite suppressants.
  4. (countable, Britain) An historical subsidy granted to the crown by Parliament for an extraordinary purpose, such as a war effort.
  5. (countable, Britain) An exchequer loan.
  6. (countable, law) A pecuniary tribute paid by a vassal to his feudal lord on special occasions.
  7. (countable) An aide-de-camp, so called by abbreviation.
    The incompetent general's brilliant aid often made priceless suggestions.
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from aid (noun)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English aiden, from Old French eider, aider, aidier, from Latin adiuto, frequentative of adiuvō ("assist", verb).

VerbEdit

aid (third-person singular simple present aids, present participle aiding, simple past and past participle aided)

  1. (transitive) To provide support to; to further the progress of; to help; to assist.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Sixt”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iii]:
      You speedy helpers [] Appear and aid me in this enterprise.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, “Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      Smith is aided in his quest by an elfin, time-jumping alien with psychic powers played by another Coen brothers veteran, A Serious Man star Michael Stuhlbarg.
  2. (climbing) To climb with the use of aids such as pitons.
    • 1979, American Alpine Journal (page 193)
      Rather than climb into a bottomless off-width crack, we aided an 80-foot A2 to A3 crack to the top of a pedestal. By very tenuous face climbing, we gained entry to the crack, which we followed to a tree beneath the big chimney.
SynonymsEdit
The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}} to add them to the appropriate sense(s).
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic عَائِد(ʿāʾid)

PostpositionEdit

aid + dative

  1. related to, relating to, having to do with
  2. concerning, about

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • aid” in Obastan.com.

BauEdit

NounEdit

aid

  1. woman

Further readingEdit


LudianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *aita.

NounEdit

aid

  1. fence

PanimEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aid

  1. woman

Further readingEdit


VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *aita.

NounEdit

aid

  1. fence

InflectionEdit

Inflection of aid
nominative sing. aid
genitive sing. aidan
partitive sing. aidad
partitive plur. aidoid
singular plural
nominative aid aidad
accusative aidan aidad
genitive aidan aidoiden
partitive aidad aidoid
essive-instructive aidan aidoin
translative aidaks aidoikš
inessive aidas aidoiš
elative aidaspäi aidoišpäi
illative ? aidoihe
adessive aidal aidoil
ablative aidalpäi aidoilpäi
allative aidale aidoile
abessive aidata aidoita
comitative aidanke aidoidenke
prolative aidadme aidoidme
approximative I aidanno aidoidenno
approximative II aidannoks aidoidennoks
egressive aidannopäi aidoidennopäi
terminative I ? aidoihesai
terminative II aidalesai aidoilesai
terminative III aidassai
additive I ? aidoihepäi
additive II aidalepäi aidoilepäi

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “забор, изгородь, ограда”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

VõroEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *aita.

NounEdit

aid (genitive aia, partitive aida)

  1. garden

InflectionEdit