See also: œ, Oe, OE, 'oe, and

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Danish ø.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oe ‎(plural oes)

  1. (literary or poetic, rare) A small island.
    • 1817, Sir Walter Scott, Harold the Dauntless, canto III:
      I love my father's northern land, / Where the dark pine-trees grow, / And the bold Baltic's echoing strand / Looks o'er each grassy oe.

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish úa, from Primitive Irish ᚐᚃᚔ(avi), from Proto-Celtic *awyos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewh₂yos.

NounEdit

oe m, f ‎(genitive singular oe, plural oeghyn)

  1. grandchild

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • úa, óa, ó” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

MunaEdit

NounEdit

oe

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • René Van Den Berg, A Grammar of the Muna Language (1989)

SardinianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hodiē.

AdverbEdit

oe

  1. today

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scottish Gaelic ogha, odha.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oe ‎(plural oes)

  1. (archaic) grandchild (especially illegitimate)
    • 1833, John Galt, The Howdie: An Autobiography,
      She told me that she was afraid her oe had brought home her wark, and that she didna doubt they would need the sleight of my hand.