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See also: œ, Oe, OE, 'oe, and

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German and Swedish ö, Danish ø.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oe (plural oes)

  1. (literary or poetic, rare) A small island.
    • 1817, Sir Walter Scott, Harold the Dauntless, canto III:
      I love my father's northern land, / Where the dark pine-trees grow, / And the bold Baltic's echoing strand / Looks o'er each grassy oe.

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish úa, from Primitive Irish ᚐᚃᚔ (avi), from Proto-Celtic *awyos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewh₂yos (grandfather).

NounEdit

oe m, f (genitive singular oe, plural oeghyn)

  1. grandchild

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • úa, óa, ó” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

MunaEdit

NounEdit

oe

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • René Van Den Berg, A Grammar of the Muna Language (1989)

NungonEdit

NounEdit

oe

  1. woman

Further readingEdit

  • Hannah Sarvasy, A Grammar of Nungon: A Papuan Language of Northeast New Guinea (2017, ISBN 9004340106)

SardinianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hodiē.

AdverbEdit

oe

  1. today

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scottish Gaelic ogha, odha.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oe (plural oes)

  1. (archaic) grandchild (especially illegitimate)
    • 1833, John Galt, The Howdie: An Autobiography,
      She told me that she was afraid her oe had brought home her wark, and that she didna doubt they would need the sleight of my hand.