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IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

ho- +‎ dio +‎ -e, based on Latin hodie.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hoˈdi.(j)e/, /hɔˈdi.(j)ɛ/

AdverbEdit

hodie

  1. today

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin.

AdverbEdit

hodie

  1. today

InterlingueEdit

AdverbEdit

hodie

  1. today

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From hōc +‎ diē, in the ablative meaning "on this day". Compare German heute (today), which is semantically the same construction, but with etymologically unrelated roots, hence not cognate.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

hodiē (not comparable)

  1. today
    Quid agis hodie?
    How are you today?

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • hodie in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hodie in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “hodie”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • hodie” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to-day the 5th of September; tomorrow September the 5th: hodie qui est dies Non. Sept.; cras qui dies futurus est Non. Sept.