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IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

ho- +‎ dio +‎ -e, based on Latin hodie.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hoˈdi.(j)e/, /hɔˈdi.(j)ɛ/

AdverbEdit

hodie

  1. today

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin.

AdverbEdit

hodie

  1. today

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From hōc +‎ diē, in the ablative meaning "on this day". Compare German heute (today), which is semantically the same construction, but with a different noun, hence not cognate.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

hodiē (not comparable)

  1. today
    Quid agis hodie?
    How are you today?

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • hodie in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hodie in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “hodie”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • hodie” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to-day the 5th of September; tomorrow September the 5th: hodie qui est dies Non. Sept.; cras qui dies futurus est Non. Sept.