See also: EY, -ey, -ey-, əy, and

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English ei, ey, from Old English ǣġ, from Proto-West Germanic *aij, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Doublet of egg, huevo, oeuf, and ovum.

This native English form was displaced by the Old Norse–derived egg in the 16th century, most likely due to its clashing with the word eye, wherewith it had come to be a homonym.

 
A box of ten eyren.

Noun edit

ey (plural eyren)

  1. (obsolete) An egg. [dated since the 16th century]
    • 1490, William Caxton, Prologue to Eneydos:
      And one of theym... cam in to an hows and axed for mete and specyally he axyd after eggys, and the goode wyf answerde that she could speke no Frenshe. And the marchaunt was angry, for he also coude speke no Frenshe, but wolde have hadde egges; and she understode hym not. And thenne at laste a-nother sayd that he wolde have eyren. Then the good wyf sayd that she understod hym wel. Loo, what sholde a man in thyse dayes now wryte, egges, or eyren? Certaynly it is hard to playse every man, by-cause of dyversite and chaunge of langage.
    • 1787, originally 1381, Liber quotidianus contrarotulatoris garderobae:
      Take brothe of capons withoute herbes, and breke eyren, and cast into the pot, and make a crudde therof, and colour hit with saffron, and then presse oute the brothe and kerve it on leches; and then take swete creme of almondes, or of cowe mylk, and boyle hit; []
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Coined by Christine M. Elverson in 1975 by removing the "th" from they.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ey (third-person singular, nominative case, accusative em, possessive adjective eir, possessive noun eirs, reflexive emself)

  1. (rare, epicene, nonstandard) A gender-neutral third-person singular subject pronoun, one of the so-called Spivak pronouns, equivalent to the singular they and coordinate with gendered pronouns he and she.
    • 1975 August 23, Judie Black, “Ey has a word for it”, in Chicago Tribune, section 1, page 12:
      Eir sentences would sound smoother since ey wouldn't clutter them with the old sexist pronouns. And if ey should trip up in the new usage, ey would only have emself to blame.
    • 1996 December 22, Shirley Worth, “New To Yoga”, in alt.yoga[1] (Usenet), message-ID <32BDCA0C.6C8@worth.org>:
      I'm not familiar with this book, but I encourage Marksmill to look for it-- and while ey is at it, to also look at a number of other books.
    • 1997 November 25, Scott Robert Dawson, “Who Pays for Cellular Calls”, in alt.cellular[2] (Usenet), message-ID <347acf56.333719@news.interlog.com>:
      If a mobile user is far from eir home area, ey will pay a long-distance fee for carriage of the call *from* eir home area, just as a caller would pay long-distance on a call *to* that area.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:ey.
Synonyms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English ei, i, ie, from Old English ēġ, īġ, īeġ, from Proto-West Germanic *auwju, from Proto-Germanic *awjō (watery land, floodplain, island), earlier *agwjō ~ *ahwjō (literally (that which is) of the water), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ékʷeh₂ (flowing water) +‎ *-yeh₂.

Noun edit

ey (plural eys)

  1. (UK) A small island formed by the buildup of silt or gravel at the confluence of two rivers or streams.
    • 1927, Essex Naturalist, page 280:
      Now it will be seen that each of the three small streamlets named forms, at its junction with the larger river into which it flows, an ey, or island, of this latter kind — Crip's-ey, Dom's-ey, and Pin's-ey, respectively; and I suggest that, from these three eys, each of the three streams indicated derived the final element of its name.
    • 2009, Julie Wileman, War and Rumours of War, page 81:
      Runnymede Bridge is situated on an 'ey' – a small gravel islet close to the river bank.
  2. A place that has a name ending in "-ey" because it is or was located at such an island.
    • 1888 January 28, Walter de Gray Birch, “WASA, ISIS, OCK”, in Academy and Literature, volume 33, number 821, page 63:
      Among the many eys, eyots, or islands, clustering about Oxford, at or near the confluence of the Isis and Cherwell, viz., Binsey, Botley, Hinksey, Iffley, Osney, Oxey, Pixey, &c., there are two, vis., Osney and Oxey, which manifestly enshrine this rivername.
    • 1924, Arthur Hadrian Allcroft, Downland Pathways, page 76:
      In Saxon the word ey meant peninsula as well as island, and there are plenty of other eys about —Langney and Hydeney and Horsey to wit, Chilly and Rickney and Northeye and Mountney.
    • 2018, Bob Gilbert, Ghost Trees: Nature and People in a London Parish:
      Bermondsey, Stepney, Hackney; there are many of these 'eys' in London and they were all once islands, or higher, dryer points in the surrounding marshlands.
Related terms edit

See also edit

  • suffix -ey
  • ey up (probably etymologically unrelated)

Anagrams edit

Azerbaijani edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Interjection edit

ey

  1. Used to call someone's attention.

German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German ei, a common interjection. In contemporary German possibly reinforced by Turkish ey (vocative particle), English hey.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ey

  1. (colloquial, originally youth slang) Used to call someone's attention, or as an intensifier when placed at the end.
    Boah, ey!
    (Whoa), man!
    Ey Peter, komm mal kucken, was hier auf dem Schild steht!
    Hey Peter, come and see what it says on this sign!
    • 2016 April 8, Jenni Zylka, quoting Udo Lindenberg, “Echo-Verleihung: Preis, der es jedem recht machen will”, in Die Tageszeitung: taz[3], →ISSN:
      Der unkorrumpierbare Udo Lindenberg, der seinen „Bestes Video national“-Gewinn galant mit „Geilomat, ey“ kommentierte []
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

See also edit

Icelandic edit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Etymology edit

From Old Norse ey, from Proto-Germanic *awjō.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ey f (genitive singular eyjar, nominative plural eyjar)

  1. island

Declension edit

The dative singular eyju/eyjunni also occurs, but is on its own indistinguishable from the dative of the weak form eyja.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old English æġ, from Proto-West Germanic *aij, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg). Doublet of egge.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ey (plural eyre or eyren)

  1. egg (especially of a chicken or other fowl)
    Synonym: eg
Descendants edit
  • English: ey (obsolete)
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old English īeġ, īg, from Proto-West Germanic *auwju, from Proto-Germanic *awjō (floodplain; island).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ey

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) island
Descendants edit
  • English: ey

References edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Latin ei and Old French ahi, äi.

Alternative forms edit

Interjection edit

ey

  1. An exclamation of surprise, challenge, or inquiry.
Descendants edit

References edit

Etymology 4 edit

Adverb edit

ey

  1. Alternative form of ay (always)

Etymology 5 edit

Noun edit

ey (plural eyen)

  1. Alternative form of eye (eye)

Etymology 6 edit

Noun edit

ey (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of eye (fear; awe)
    To have no ey for nought.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    • c. 1470, O lord omnipotent:
      Exhorting thy people to have a special ey, That thee to praise they never cease.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Verb edit

ey

  1. to awe

Middle Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

ey

  1. second-person singular present indicative of mynet

Old Norse edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Germanic *aiwaz m, *aiwō f (long time, age, eternity), itself from Proto-Indo-European *h₂óyu ~ *h₂yéws. Cognate of Proto-Finnic *auvo.

Adverb edit

ey

  1. always, ever
Alternative forms edit

References edit

  • ey1”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Germanic *awjō.

Noun edit

ey f (genitive eyjar, dative eyju, plural eyjar)

  1. island
Declension edit
Descendants edit
  • Icelandic: ey f, eyja f
  • Faroese: oyggj f, oy f
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: øy
    • Norwegian Bokmål: øy
  • Old Swedish: ø̄
    • Swedish: ö c
  • Danish: ø c
    • English: oe
  • Gutnish: oy
  • English: -ey, -ay (in place names)
  • Old Irish: í f
    • Irish: í f

References edit

  • ey2”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Etymology 3 edit

From Proto-Norse ᚨᚢᛃᚨ (auja), itself from Proto-Germanic *aują n, itself from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew- (enjoy). See also Proto-Germanic *auþuz (easy) and Old English ieþe (easy).

Noun edit

ey n

  1. (hapax) luck, fortune
    • Found twice in the same place, in a prayer towards the Cross recorded in Landnámabók:
      Gott ey gǫmlum mǫnnum, gott ey ungum mǫnnum.
      Good fortune to old men, good fortune to young men.
Declension edit

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

ey

  1. Obsolete spelling of hei

Somali edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

èy m (plural éy or eyo f)

  1. dog

Spanish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English hey.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈei/ [ˈei̯]
  • Rhymes: -ei
  • Syllabification: ey

Interjection edit

¡ey!

  1. hey!
    Synonym: eh

Related terms edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Perhaps borrowed from Turkish ey (vocative article).

Interjection edit

ey

  1. (slang) Used to call someone's attention.
    Ey, mannen, vi gittar!
    Hey, man, let's get out of here!

See also edit

  • hej (has a list of greetings and farewells)

References edit

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

From English ay, the English name of the letter A/a.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: ey
  • IPA(key): /ˈʔej/, [ˈʔɛɪ̯]
  • Rhymes: -ej

Noun edit

ey (Baybayin spelling ᜁᜌ᜔)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter A/a, in the Filipino alphabet.
    Synonym: a

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • ey”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Turkish edit

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ey

  1. The vocative particle, used for direct adress
    Ey ahali! Anlatacaklarımı dikkatlice dinleyin!