See also: OES, OES., -ões, ös, öš, and -ös

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

oes

  1. (rare) plural of o, the name of the letter O.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, The Epic
      Mouthing out his hollow oes and aes, / Deep-chested music.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Masques and Triumphs
      The Colours, that shew best by Candlelight, are; White, Carnation, and a Kinde of Sea-Water-Greene; And Oes, or Spangs, as they are of no great Cost, so they are of most Glory.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Southern Dutch oest (Flemish and Zeelandic form of oogst), from Middle Dutch oest, from Old French aoust, from Latin augustus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oes (plural oeste)

  1. harvest

GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

oes

  1. second-person singular present indicative of oír

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oes

  1. plural of o

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Cognate with English "if is", German "ob ist". Probably Celtic "op is" with the p disapearing giving "o is".

VerbEdit

oes

  1. (in a question) is there; are there?
  2. (in answer to a question beginning with oes) yes

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Welsh ois, from Proto-Brythonic *oɨs, from Proto-Celtic *aissom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ey- (life, age). Ultimately cognate with Welsh oed, Latin aevus.

NounEdit

oes f (plural oesoedd)

  1. age, period
    Oes yr
    the Ice Age
  2. life, lifetime, lifespan
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “oes”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies
  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*ay-sso-, *ay-to-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 51

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
oes unchanged unchanged hoes
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.