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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back formation from oration, from Latin ōrātiō (speech, discourse, oration), from ōrātus (spoken, orated), from ōrō (speak, pray).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɔːˈɹeɪt/, /ɒɹˈeɪt/, /əˈɹeɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹ.eɪt/, /ɔˈɹeɪt/
  • (file)
    ,
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  • Rhymes: -eɪt

VerbEdit

orate (third-person singular simple present orates, present participle orating, simple past and past participle orated)

  1. To speak formally; to give a speech.
  2. To speak passionately; to preach for or against something.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

orate (comparative more orate, superlative most orate)

  1. Competent in oracy; having good speaking skills.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

orate f pl

  1. plural of orata

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

AdjectiveEdit

orate

  1. Feminine plural of adjective orato.

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

ParticipleEdit

orate

  1. feminine plural of orato

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

orate

  1. inflection of orare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Catalan orat, from a derivative of Latin aura, in the sense of an ill or unhealthy air or aura.

NounEdit

orate m or f (plural orates)

  1. (derogatory) A crazy person.