See also: Oral, orał, and орал

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Early 17th century borrowing from Late Latin ōrālis, from ōs (the mouth) +‎ -ālis (-al, adjectival suffix).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

oral (not comparable)

  1. (relational) Relating to the mouth.
    Synonym: (rare) mouthly
    oral hygiene
    1. (pharmacology) Done or taken by the mouth.
    2. (phonetics, of a speech sound) Pronounced by the voice resonating in the mouth, as the vowels in English.
    3. (psychoanalysis, in Freudian theory) Relating to or denoting a stage of infantile psychosexual development during which libidinal gratification is derived from intake (as of food), by sucking, and later by biting.
    4. Of, relating to, or characterized by personality traits of passive dependency and aggressiveness.
  2. (relational) Spoken rather than written.
    Synonyms: spoken, verbal
    Antonym: written
    an oral presentation
    an oral French exam
    1. Relating to the transmission of information or literature by word of mouth.
    2. Using speech or the lips especially in teaching the deaf.
    3. (sociolinguistics, of a society) Not having reached the stage of literacy.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

oral (plural orals)

  1. (countable) A spoken test or examination, particularly in a language class.
    We've got our Spanish oral tomorrow.
  2. (countable, usually in the plural) A physical examination of the mouth.
  3. (uncountable, informal) Ellipsis of oral sex.
    I gave my boyfriend oral for the first time on his birthday.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch overal, from Middle Dutch overal, from Old Dutch overal.

AdverbEdit

oral

  1. everywhere

Alternative formsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

oral (masculine and feminine plural orals)

  1. oral

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

oral

  1. masculine singular past participle of orat

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ōrālis, from ōs (mouth).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

oral (feminine singular orale, masculine plural oraux, feminine plural orales)

  1. oral

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

oral m (plural oraux)

  1. an oral exam, a viva, a viva voce

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin os, oris (mouth) + -al.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

oral (not comparable)

  1. Relating to the mouth.

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • oral” in Duden online

InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

oral (not comparable)

  1. oral (pertaining to the mouth)

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: o‧ral
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

EtymologyEdit

From Latin oralis

AdjectiveEdit

oral m or f (plural orais, comparable)

  1. oral

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French oral.

AdjectiveEdit

oral m or n (feminine singular orală, masculine plural orali, feminine and neuter plural orale)

  1. oral

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

oral m (Cyrillic spelling орал)

  1. Obsolete spelling of orao

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin os, oris (mouth) + -al.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /oˈɾal/, [oˈɾal]

AdjectiveEdit

oral (plural orales)

  1. oral

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit