See also: orgánum

English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin organum, itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon, organ, instrument, tool). Doublet of organ, organon, and orgue.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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organum (countable and uncountable, plural organums or organa)

  1. (music) A type of medieval polyphony which builds upon an existing plainsong.
  2. (archaic) A method by which philosophical or scientific investigation may be conducted.
    • 1794, George Adams, Lectures on natural and experimental philosophy:
      He has given us an organum of a different origin and construction from that of Arislotle []
    • 1823, Thomas Wirgman, An Entirely New, Complete and Permanent Science of Philosophy:
      Another important circumstance respecting our transcendental esthetics is, that it does not insinuate itself merely as a plausible hypothesis, but is as certain and indubitable as we can require any theory to be in order to serve as an organum.

Derived terms

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Translations

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Latin

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon, organ, instrument, tool).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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organum n (genitive organī); second declension

  1. an implement, instrument, tool
  2. any musical instrument

Declension

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Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative organum organa
Genitive organī organōrum
Dative organō organīs
Accusative organum organa
Ablative organō organīs
Vocative organum organa

Derived terms

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Descendants

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Note: In many Romance languages, it is unclear whether inherited or borrowed from Latin.

References

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  • organum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • organum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • organum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • organum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • organum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin organum. Doublet of organe.

Noun

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organum (plural organum)

  1. A device used to produce music; a musical instrument.
  2. A keyboard instrument that produces sound by air moved through pipes; an organ.

Synonyms

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References

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French organum.

Noun

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organum n (uncountable)

  1. organum

Declension

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