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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin percōlō (I filter), itself, from per (through) + cōlō (I strain) (from cōlum (a strainer), of unknown origin).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

percolate (third-person singular simple present percolates, present participle percolating, simple past and past participle percolated)

  1. (transitive) To pass a liquid through a porous substance; to filter.
  2. (intransitive) To drain or seep through a porous substance.
    Water percolates through sand.
  3. (transitive) To make (coffee) in a percolator.
    I'll percolate some coffee.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To spread slowly or gradually; to slowly become noticed or realised.
    Reports on the pitiful state of many prisons have finally percolated through to the Home Office, which has promised to look into the situation.
    Through media reports it percolated to the surface that the police investigation was profoundly flawed.

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TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

percolate (plural percolates)

  1. (rare) A liquid that has been percolated.

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LatinEdit