See also: Colo, colo-, and čoło

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

colo (uncountable)

  1. (computing) co-location.
    The previous wall outlet tests at their colo facility ran for 6 days straight without issue.
    One was a mistake in the colo, where there was a mislabeled circuit, so they cut power to 1/3 of one of our racks.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a contraction of the preposition con (with) + neuter singular article lo (the).

ContractionEdit

colo n (masculine col, feminine cola, masculine plural colos, feminine plural coles)

  1. with the

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

colo

  1. First-person singular present indicative form of colar.

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

colo (plural coloj, accusative singular colon, accusative plural colojn)

  1. inch

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

colo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of colare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier *quelō, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to move; to turn (around)). Many cognates including Ancient Greek πέλ (pel), Sanskrit चरति (cárati), English wheel. Same Proto-Indo-European root also gave Latin in-quil-īnus (inhabitant) and anculus (servant).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

present active colō, present infinitive colere, perfect active coluī, supine cultum

  1. I till, cultivate
  2. I inhabit
  3. I protect, nurture
  4. (figuratively) I worship, honor
InflectionEdit
Related termsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From cōlum (colander, strainer).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

present active cōlō, present infinitive cōlāre, perfect active cōlāvī, supine cōlātum

  1. I filter, strain, purify
InflectionEdit
Related termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • cōlātus
DescendantsEdit

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese colo, from Latin collum (neck).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

colo m (plural colos)

  1. lap (upper legs of a seated person)
  2. (anatomy) neck; collum (part of body connecting the head and the trunk)
  3. (anatomy) neck (part of a bone that connects its head to its body)
  4. (anatomy) cervix (necklike portion of any part)
  5. gap (mountain or hill pass)
  6. (botany) the channel of an archegonium
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin cōlon (colon), from Ancient Greek κῶλον (kōlon, limb).

NounEdit

colo m (plural colos)

  1. Alternative form of cólon.

Etymology 3Edit

Inflected form of colar (to glue; to adhere).

VerbEdit

colo

  1. First-person singular (eu) present indicative of colar
Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 16:00