See also: Colo, coló, colò, colo-, -colo, Colo., coło, and čoło

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

colo (uncountable)

  1. (computing) co-location
    The previous wall outlet tests at their colo facility ran for 6 days straight without issue.
    One was a mistake in the colo, where there was a mislabeled circuit, so they cut power to 1/3 of one of our racks.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a contraction of the preposition con (with) + neuter singular article lo (the).

ContractionEdit

colo n (masculine col, feminine cola, masculine plural colos, feminine plural coles)

  1. with the

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

colo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of colar

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Zoll.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡solo/
  • Hyphenation: co‧lo
  • Rhymes: -olo
  • Audio:
    (file)

NounEdit

colo (accusative singular colon, plural coloj, accusative plural colojn)

  1. inch

Related termsEdit

  • futo (foot; 12 inches)
  • jardo (yard; 3 feet or 36 inches)
  • mejlo (mile; 1,760 yards or 63,360 inches)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of colonie (see colonie de vacances).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

colo f (plural colos)

  1. (informal) camp

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese colo, from Latin collum (neck).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

colo m (plural colos)

  1. (anatomy) neck; collum (part of body connecting the head and the trunk)
  2. (anatomy) neck (part of a bone that connects its head to its body)
  3. (anatomy) cervix (necklike portion of any part)
  4. lap (upper legs of a seated person)
    Synonyms: abada, bada, abán, seo, regazo
  5. torso, shoulders and arms of a standing person
    • c1295, R. Lorenzo (ed.), La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla. Ourense: I.E.O.P.F., page 690:
      Et por esta razõ sempre andou en andas et en colo dos omes ata que morreu.
      And for this reason he always went in stretchers and in the arms of men until he died
    • 1439, X. Ferro Couselo (ed.), A vida e a fala dos devanceiros. Escolma de documentos en galego dos séculos XIII ao XVI. 2 vols. Vigo: Galaxia, page 419:
      Sisa das olas: Iten, ordenaron que qual quer persona que trouxer carga d'olas de fora parte a vender aa dita çidade, que page de cada carga d'olas, duas brancas e de un costal d'olas, hua branca, e do feixe das olas que trouxer en collo, un diñeyro, e de cada qántara, dous diñeiros
      Assize of the pots: Item, they ordered that any person who brings a load of pots from the outside for selling inside this city, that they shall pay two white coins for each load; and a white coin for a sack; and for the lot that they carry in their arms, a coin; an two coins for each amphora
    Non leves a nena no colo, deixa que ande.Don't carry the little girl in your arms, let her walk.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • colo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • colo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • colo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • colo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • colo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cōlum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.lo/, [ˈkoːl̺o]
  • Rhymes: -olo
  • Hyphenation: có‧lo

NounEdit

colo m (plural coli) (rare)

  1. A kind of sieve or strainer.
    Synonyms: crivello, staccio

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.lo/, [ˈkoːl̺o]
  • Rhymes: -olo
  • Hyphenation: có‧lo

VerbEdit

colo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of colare

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin colon, from Ancient Greek κόλον (kólon).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.lo/, [ˈkɔːl̺o]
  • Hyphenation: cò‧lo

NounEdit

colo m (uncountable)

  1. Archaic form of colon.

Etymology 4Edit

From Latin cōlon, from Ancient Greek κῶλον (kôlon).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.lo/, [ˈkɔːl̺o]
  • Hyphenation: cò‧lo

NounEdit

colo m (plural cola)

  1. A member or part of a verse of a poem.
  2. An ancient punctuation mark.

Etymology 5Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

colo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of colere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier *quelō, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to move, to turn (around), to revolve around, and therefore to sojourn, to dwell). The same root also gave in-quil-īnus (inhabitant) and anculus (servant).

Cognates include Ancient Greek πέλω (pélō), πόλος (pólos), τέλλω (téllō), τέλος (télos), τῆλε (têle), πάλαι (pálai), κύκλος (kúklos), Sanskrit चरति (cárati), English wheel.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

colō (present infinitive colere, perfect active coluī, supine cultum); third conjugation

  1. I till, cultivate the land (literal)
  2. I inhabit
  3. I protect, nurture
  4. (figuratively) I worship, honor
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Exodus.20.5:
      Nōn adōrābis ea, neque colēs: ego sum Dominus Deus tuus fortis, zēlōtēs, vīsitāns inīquitātem patrum in fīliōs, in tertiam et quārtam generātiōnem eōrum quī ōdērunt mē.
      Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me.
Usage notesEdit

The words colō and excolō can be confused in usage. Their root being the Proto-Indo-European *kʷel-, originally colō probably meant turning (plowing for cultivation) the soil, and by extension of inhabiting a place; by further extension, it adopted the senses of improving said habitation by cultivating the land and through the specific nurture of crops. While figurative senses of nurturing and improving are attributable to colō, they are more properly rendered by excolō, since nurture and improvement are the parts of the (literal) process of land cultivation "out of" (ex-) which springs excolō, rendering the figurative and universal sense of cultivating. This means colō/cultus/cultiō can properly render cultivation strictly in the agricultural sense, while excolō/excultus/excultiō are for the senses of cultivation—improvement by means of effort or labor—in the general, non-agricultural sense.

ConjugationEdit
   Conjugation of colō (third conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present colō colis colit colimus colitis colunt
imperfect colēbam colēbās colēbat colēbāmus colēbātis colēbant
future colam colēs colet colēmus colētis colent
perfect coluī coluistī coluit coluimus coluistis coluērunt, coluēre
pluperfect colueram coluerās coluerat coluerāmus coluerātis coluerant
future perfect coluerō colueris coluerit coluerimus colueritis coluerint
passive present color coleris, colere colitur colimur coliminī coluntur
imperfect colēbar colēbāris, colēbāre colēbātur colēbāmur colēbāminī colēbantur
future colar colēris, colēre colētur colēmur colēminī colentur
perfect cultus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect cultus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect cultus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present colam colās colat colāmus colātis colant
imperfect colerem colerēs coleret colerēmus colerētis colerent
perfect coluerim coluerīs coluerit coluerīmus coluerītis coluerint
pluperfect coluissem coluissēs coluisset coluissēmus coluissētis coluissent
passive present colar colāris, colāre colātur colāmur colāminī colantur
imperfect colerer colerēris, colerēre colerētur colerēmur colerēminī colerentur
perfect cultus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect cultus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present cole colite
future colitō colitō colitōte coluntō
passive present colere coliminī
future colitor colitor coluntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives colere coluisse cultūrum esse colī cultum esse cultum īrī
participles colēns cultūrus cultus colendus, colundus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
colendī colendō colendum colendō cultum cultū
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • French: cultiver
  • Italian: coltivare
  • Spanish: cultivar

Etymology 2Edit

From cōlum (colander, strainer).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cōlō (present infinitive cōlāre, perfect active cōlāvī, supine cōlātum); first conjugation

  1. I filter, strain, purify
ConjugationEdit
   Conjugation of cōlō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present cōlō cōlās cōlat cōlāmus cōlātis cōlant
imperfect cōlābam cōlābās cōlābat cōlābāmus cōlābātis cōlābant
future cōlābō cōlābis cōlābit cōlābimus cōlābitis cōlābunt
perfect cōlāvī cōlāvistī cōlāvit cōlāvimus cōlāvistis cōlāvērunt, cōlāvēre
pluperfect cōlāveram cōlāverās cōlāverat cōlāverāmus cōlāverātis cōlāverant
future perfect cōlāverō cōlāveris cōlāverit cōlāverimus cōlāveritis cōlāverint
passive present cōlor cōlāris, cōlāre cōlātur cōlāmur cōlāminī cōlantur
imperfect cōlābar cōlābāris, cōlābāre cōlābātur cōlābāmur cōlābāminī cōlābantur
future cōlābor cōlāberis, cōlābere cōlābitur cōlābimur cōlābiminī cōlābuntur
perfect cōlātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect cōlātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect cōlātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present cōlem cōlēs cōlet cōlēmus cōlētis cōlent
imperfect cōlārem cōlārēs cōlāret cōlārēmus cōlārētis cōlārent
perfect cōlāverim cōlāverīs cōlāverit cōlāverīmus cōlāverītis cōlāverint
pluperfect cōlāvissem cōlāvissēs cōlāvisset cōlāvissēmus cōlāvissētis cōlāvissent
passive present cōler cōlēris, cōlēre cōlētur cōlēmur cōlēminī cōlentur
imperfect cōlārer cōlārēris, cōlārēre cōlārētur cōlārēmur cōlārēminī cōlārentur
perfect cōlātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect cōlātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present cōlā cōlāte
future cōlātō cōlātō cōlātōte cōlantō
passive present cōlāre cōlāminī
future cōlātor cōlātor cōlantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives cōlāre cōlāvisse cōlātūrum esse cōlārī cōlātum esse cōlātum īrī
participles cōlāns cōlātūrus cōlātus cōlandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
cōlandī cōlandō cōlandum cōlandō cōlātum cōlātū
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • colo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • colo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • colo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • colo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to keep up, foster a connection: amicitiam colere
    • to pay respect to, be courteous to a person: aliquem colere et observare (Att. 2. 19)
    • to be engaged in the pursuit of letters: litteras colere
    • to cultivate the mind: animum, ingenium excolere (not colere)
    • to preserve one's loyalty: fidem colere, servare
    • to do one's duty: officium suum facere, servare, colere, tueri, exsequi, praestare
    • to honour the gods with all due ceremonial (very devoutly): deum rite (summa religione) colere
    • to pay divine honours to some one: aliquem divino honere colere
    • to till the ground: agrum colere (Leg. Agr. 2. 25. 67)

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese colo, from Latin collum (neck).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

colo m (plural colos)

  1. lap (upper legs of a seated person)
    Synonym: regaço
  2. (anatomy) neck; collum (part of body connecting the head and the trunk)
  3. (anatomy) neck (part of a bone that connects its head to its body)
  4. (anatomy) cervix (necklike portion of any part)
  5. gap (mountain or hill pass)
    Synonyms: passo, portela, porto
  6. (botany) the channel of an archegonium
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin cōlon (colon), from Ancient Greek κῶλον (kôlon, limb).

NounEdit

colo m (plural colos)

  1. Alternative form of cólon

Etymology 3Edit

Inflected form of colar (to glue; to adhere).

VerbEdit

colo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of colar