Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A corruption of pickaback, itself a corruption of pick-pack, like a pack.

AdjectiveEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia piggyback ‎(comparative more piggyback, superlative most piggyback)

  1. On somebody's back or shoulders.
    a piggyback ride
  2. Pertaining to transportation of goods where one transportation unit is carried on the back of something else. For example, a truck on a train.
    Until this time the railroads had favored piggyback services (...) (John H. Mahoney, Intermodal Freight Transportation, 1985)

AdverbEdit

piggyback ‎(comparative more piggyback, superlative most piggyback)

  1. On somebody's back or shoulders.
    to ride piggyback

SynonymsEdit

  • (on somebody's back or shoulders): pooseback (some US dialects)

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

piggyback ‎(third-person singular simple present piggybacks, present participle piggybacking, simple past and past participle piggybacked)

  1. (transitive) To attach or append something to another (usually larger) object or event.
    They tried to piggyback that proposal on the rivers and harbors bill.
    The popular host can’t claim credit for the trade, though. The idea wasn’t his. He piggybacked off another successful investor who had a history of picking winners.
  2. (transitive, Internet) To obtain a wireless internet connection by bringing one's own computer within the range of another's wireless connection without that subscriber's permission or knowledge.
  3. (transitive, Internet) Utilizing last mile wiring (not wireless slang) rented from a larger owner ISP by a smaller ISP, last milers are obligated to sell to competitors in places like Canada.
  4. (transitive) to carry someone on the back or shoulders.
  5. To transport a lorry / truck on a flatbed railway waggon

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

piggyback ‎(plural piggybacks)

  1. A ride on somebody's back or shoulders.
  2. An act or instance of piggybacking.

ReferencesEdit

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