See also: Wagon and wagōn

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
A horse-drawn, covered wagon.
 
A station wagon.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch wagen, from Proto-Germanic *wagnaz(wagon), from Proto-Indo-European *woǵʰnos, from *weǵʰ-(to transport). Compare the inherited doublet wain and related way, weigh.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wagon ‎(plural wagons)

  1. A four-wheeled cart for hauling loads.
  2. A freight car on a railway.
  3. A child's riding toy, four-wheeled and pulled or steered by a long handle in the front.
  4. (US, Australia, slang) A station wagon (or SUV).
  5. (slang) A paddy wagon.
  6. A truck, or lorry.
  7. (Ireland, slang, dated, derogatory) A derogatory term for a woman; bitch; slapper; cow.
    • 1974, in Threshold, Issues 25–27,[1] Lyric Players Theatre, page 96:
      “I’m not like that; I know what you mean but I’m not like that. When you said a field I nearly laughed because I was in a field last week with Ursula Brogan behind the football pitch. We followed Cissy Caffery there and two boys from the secondary. She’s a wagon. She did it with them one after the other, and we watched.”
    • 1990, Roddy Doyle, The Snapper, Penguin Group (1992), ISBN 978-0-14-017167-9:
      pages 30–31: —Don’t know. ——She hates us. It’s prob’ly cos Daddy called her a wagon at tha’ meetin’. ¶ Sharon laughed. She got out of bed. ¶ —He didn’t really call Miss O’Keefe a wagon, she told Tracy. —He was only messin’ with yeh.
    • 1998, Neville Thompson, Two Birds/One Stoned,[2] Poolbeg:
      page 8: “Well fuck yeh, yeh stuck-up little wagon.”

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

wagon ‎(third-person singular simple present wagons, present participle wagoning, simple past and past participle wagoned)

  1. (transitive) To transport by means of a wagon.
  2. (intransitive) To travel in a wagon.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

 
wagon

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English waggon, from Dutch wagen. The pronunciation was likely influenced by French wagon, which was also borrowed from English.

NounEdit

wagon m ‎(plural wagons, diminutive wagonnetje n)

  1. car (a railway carriage, a nonpowered unit in a railroad train)

FrenchEdit

 
wagon

EtymologyEdit

From English waggon, from Dutch wagen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wagon m ‎(plural wagons)

  1. a railway carriage (note that the word voiture is preferred for passenger transport)

External linksEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

wagon

  1. Romaji transcription of わごん
  2. Romaji transcription of ワゴン

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wagōną.

VerbEdit

wagon

  1. to sway

PolishEdit

 
wagon

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wagon m inan

  1. car (a railway carriage, a nonpowered unit in a railroad train)
  2. (colloquial) truckload

DeclensionEdit