EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin pīus (pious, dutiful, blessed, kind, devout), from Proto-Indo-European *pewH- (pure). Cognate with Old English fǣle (faithful, trusty, good; dear, beloved). More at feal.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpaɪəs/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

pious (comparative more pious, superlative most pious)

  1. Of or pertaining to piety, exhibiting piety, devout, godfearing.
    • December 2014, Paul Salopek, “Blessed. Cursed. Claimed”, in National Geographic[1]:
      Its male residents dress like crows: heavy black suits, black Borsalino hats, the old grandfathers hugely whiskered and the boys in peot, the curled sidelocks of the pious.
  2. Relating to religion or religious works.
    • A pious cause.
  3. Insisting on or making a show of one's own virtue, especially in comparison to others; sanctimonious, condescending, judgmental.

Usage notesEdit

  • Sometimes used pejoratively, in the sense of "mistaken" or "false" piety, as in "pious errors", "pious frauds".

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TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit