Translingual edit

Symbol edit

pi

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Pali.

English edit

Ancient Greek Alphabet

omicron
  
rho
Π π
Ancient Greek: πεῖ
Wikipedia article on pi
 
This mosaic is outside the mathematics building at the Technische Universität Berlin.
 
When a circle's diameter is 1 unit, its circumference is π units.
 
When a circle's radius is 1 unit, its circumference is 2π units.

Etymology 1 edit

From Ancient Greek πεῖ (peî), ultimately from Proto-Semitic *pay- (mouth). Doublet of pe. Its mathematical use apparently stems from its use as the first letter in περιφέρεια (periphéreia, periphery; circumference) and was first cited in 1706 in the Synopsis Palmariorum Matheseos by William Jones.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi (countable and uncountable, plural pis)

  1. The 16th letter of the Classical and Modern Greek alphabets and the seventeenth in Old Greek.
  2. (mathematics) An irrational and transcendental constant representing the ratio of the circumference of a Euclidean circle to its diameter; approximately 3.14159265358979323846264338327950; usually written π.
  3. (letterpress typography) Metal type that has been spilled, mixed together, or disordered.
    Alternative form: pie
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

pi (third-person singular simple present pies, present participle piing, simple past and past participle pied)

  1. (letterpress typography) To spill or mix printing type.
    Alternative form: pie

Adjective edit

pi (not comparable)

  1. (typography) Not part of the usual font character set; especially, non-Roman type or symbols as opposed to standard alphanumeric Roman type.
    In computing, pi characters may be entered with special key combinations.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Abbreviations.

Noun edit

pi

  1. (typography) pica (conventionally, 12 points = 1 pica, 6 picas = 1 inch).
  2. Piaster.

Adjective edit

pi

  1. Pious.
    • 1927, Magdalen King-Hall, I Think I Remember: Being the Random Recollections of Sir Wickham Woolicomb, an Ordinary English Snob and Gentleman:
      Our Major was "Cherub" Cheeseman, noted for his foul language. I am afraid he lost a tidy little legacy that he was expecting from his aunt, the Dowager Lady Shuttlecock (a very "pi" old lady), through this same habit of his.
    • 1972, Anya Seton, Green Darkness, Hachette UK, →ISBN:
      “Those are very 'pi' sentiments. Was a preacher in Staffordshire— I was raised chapel, though've tried to forget it—he talked that way... redemption and the lot.”
    • 1994, Roger Gard, Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of Clarity, Yale University Press, →ISBN, page 101:
      In Sense and Sensibility, as even you might agree, there's at least the danger of a rather pi moral framework clamping down on the spontaneous fun and leaving the sisters to survive - a bit drearily - on the periphery of a mean world.
Related terms edit

See also edit

  • pi-jaw (etymologically unrelated)

Anagrams edit

Abinomn edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. (anatomy) gall bladder

Pronoun edit

pi

  1. you (more than two)

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Albanian pii, from Proto-Albanian *pīja, from Proto-Indo-European *pih₃-, *peh₃- probably via the reduplicated form *píph₃eti; compare Greek πίνω (píno), Serbo-Croatian pìti, Italian bere. Orel compares the similarity between Proto-Albanian *pīja and Proto-Slavic *pijǫ;[1] Tomaschek compares Tosk pirë/Gheg pinë with Thracian πίνον (pínon, beer).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. to drink, to suck
  2. to smoke (in use with duhan (tobacco, cigarettes))
  3. to take (in use with drogë (drug(s)) and medicinë (medicine))
    A pi drogë?Do you take drugs?
    A i pive ilaçet?Did you take (your) medicine?

Usage notes edit

  1. (Standard, Tosk) ai pi - he drinks / he is a drinker
    (Standard, Tosk) (unë) nuk pi duhan - I do not smoke
    (Gheg) ai pin - he drinks / he is a drinker
    (Gheg) (unë) nuk pi duhan - I do not smoke

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998), “pi”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden; Boston; Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 324-325

Ambonese Malay edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of pigi.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

pi

  1. (intransitive) to go
    Beta pi ka bendar.I'm going to the city.

References edit

  • D. Takaria, C. Pieter (1998) Kamus Bahasa Melayu Ambon-Indonesia[2], Pusat Pembinaan dan Pengembangan Bahasa

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin per. Compare Romanian pe.

Preposition edit

pi

  1. on

Related terms edit

Berawan edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. (Central, West) water

References edit

  • Robert Blust, 2000, Low Vowel Fronting in Northern Sarawak, Oceanic Linguistics, 39:2, pp. 285-319, page 316
  • Robert Blust, 2006, The Origin of the Kelabit Voiced Aspirates: A Historical Hypothesis Revisited, Oceanic Linguistics, 45:2, pages 311-338

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Catalan pin, from Latin pīnus, ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *poi- (sap, juice).

Noun edit

pi m (plural pins)

  1. pine; evergreen tree of the genus Pinus
  2. pinewood
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

pi f (plural pis)

  1. Pi; the Greek letter Π (lowercase π)

References edit

  • “pi” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Chachi edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water
  2. river

References edit

  • Peter W. Stahl, Archaeology in the Lowland American Tropics (2006, →ISBN, page 253
  • Randall Q. Huber, Robert B. Reed, Comparative vocabulary, page 86, 1992

Classical Nahuatl edit

Verb edit

pi ()

  1. (transitive) To pluck

References edit

  • J. Richard Andrews (2003) Workbook for Introduction to Classical Nahuatl, Revised Edition, University of Oklahoma Press

Dalmatian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pes, pedem.

Noun edit

pi m (plural pič)

  1. foot

Danish edit

Proper noun edit

pi

  1. pi (number)
  2. pi (letter)

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek πεῖ (peî). Doublet of pe, pee (Hebrew letter).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi f or m (plural pi's, diminutive pi'tje n)

  1. pi (Greek letter)
  2. (mathematics) pi (number)

Further reading edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

pi m (plural pi)

  1. pi (Greek letter)
  2. (mathematics) pi

Etymology 2 edit

Conjunction edit

pi

  1. (Quebec, colloquial) Alternative spelling of pis (and)

Further reading edit

Greenlandic edit

Root edit

pi

  1. Means nothing in particular.

Usage notes edit

See note at su.

Derived terms edit

Guambiano edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water
  2. river

References edit

  • Beatriz Vásquez de Ruiz, La predicación en guambiano (Colciencias, 1988)
  • Randall Q. Huber, Robert B. Reed, Comparative vocabulary, page 86, 1992

Inuktitut edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. Latin spelling of (pi)

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpi/
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Hyphenation:

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin (the name of the letter P).

Noun edit

pi f (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P.; pee
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

From Ancient Greek πεῖ (peî, the name of the Greek letter Π).

Noun edit

pi m (invariable)

  1. the name of the Greek-script letter Π/π; pi
  2. (mathematics) Synonym of pi greco
Derived terms edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

pi

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Kari'na edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Cariban *pitupô.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi (possessed pìpo)

  1. skin
  2. bark
  3. peel, rind
  4. outer wall (of a basket)
  5. skin, membrane (of a drum)

References edit

  • Courtz, Hendrik (2008) A Carib grammar and dictionary[3], Toronto: Magoria Books, →ISBN, page 344
  • Ahlbrinck, Willem (1931), “pipo”, in Encyclopaedie der Karaïben, Amsterdam: Koninklijke Akademie van Wetenschappen, page 376; republished as Willem Ahlbrinck, ; Doude van Herwijnen, transl., L'Encyclopédie des Caraïbes[4], Paris, 1956, page 367

Kedah Malay edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

pi

  1. Go
    Satgi kalau depa nak pi keluaq dah, habaq kat aku awai sikit noh, satgi tak dan.
    If they are ready to go out, please inform me earlier, so that I won't be late.
    Hang ni oghang kata pa pun bukan nak dengaq, mampuih pi kat hang la.
    You never listen, just go to hell
  2. Do
    Hangpa pi bedak elok-elok bagi sama banyak buah moktan tu, satgi baghu tak berkelai.
    You should split the rambutans equally between yourselves, then you won't have to fight over it.
    Awat yang hang pi pukui dia, satgi dia bawak mai geng pi taboh hang pulak, lagu mana?
    Why did you hit him, don't you afraid he might summon his gang to beat you up?

See also edit

Lango (Uganda) edit

Noun edit

  1. water

References edit

  • Michael P. Noonan, A Grammar of Lango [Uganda]

Luo edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water

References edit

  • Benny Garell Blount, Acquisition of Language by Luo Children (1969), page 57
  • Roy Lawrence Stafford, An elementary Luo grammar, page 24, 1967

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

pi

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Marshallese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bee.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. bee

References edit

Mokilese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. vagina
    Synonym: pwapwahk

Declension edit

Norman edit

Alternative forms edit

  • pyid (continental Normandy)
  • pid (Jersey, Guernsey)

Etymology edit

From Old French pié, from Latin pēs, pedis, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Noun edit

pi m (plural pis)

  1. (Sark, anatomy) foot

Nuer edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water

References edit

  • Joseph Pasquale Crazzolara, Outlines of a Nuer grammar, page 28, 1933

Pali edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Enclitic form of api.

Particle edit

pi

  1. an emphatic particle

Derived terms edit

Conjunction edit

pi

  1. also, even so
  2. even

References edit

  • Pali Text Society (1921–1925), “pi”, in Pali-English Dictionary‎, London: Chipstead

Pirahã edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water[3]
  2. thorn[1]

References edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Handbook of Amazonian Languages, Volume 1, 1986
  2. ^ Čestmír Loukotka, ‎Johannes Wilbert (editor), Classification of South American Indian Languages (1968, Los Angeles: Latin American Studies Center, University of California), page(s) 96 (as , ipé)
  3. ^ “Pirahã Dictionary/ Dicionário Mura-Pirahã”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[1], 2011 February 2 (last accessed), archived from the original on 2 February 2011

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection edit

pi

  1. cheep, used to imitate the sound made by a chick

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek πεῖ (peî), from Phoenician 𐤐 (p /⁠pē⁠/).

Noun edit

pi n (indeclinable)

  1. pi (Greek letter Π, π)
  2. (mathematics) pi (irrational mathematical constant)

Further reading edit

  • pi in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Rhymes: -i

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek πεῖ (peî).

Noun edit

pi m (plural pis)

  1. pi (name of the Greek letter Π, π)

Etymology 2 edit

Onomatopoeic.

Alternative forms edit

Interjection edit

pi

  1. bleep (high-pitched sound)

Quechua edit

Pronoun edit

pi

  1. who

Romagnol edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin plēnus (full).

Adjective edit

pi m (feminine pina, masculine plural pi, feminine plural pini)

  1. full

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Greek πι (pi).

Noun edit

pi m (uncountable)

  1. pi

Declension edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

 n (Cyrillic spelling пи̑)

  1. pi (Greek letter)
  2. pi (mathematical constant)

Shilluk edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water

References edit

  • B. Kohnen, Shilluk grammar : with a little English-Shilluk dictionary, Missioni Africane, Vérone, Italie, 317 pages, page 313, 1933

Slovene edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

 m inan

  1. pi (Greek letter)
  2. pi (mathematical constant)

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., soft o-stem
nom. sing.
gen. sing. píja
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
píja píji
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
píja píjev píjev
dative
(dajȃlnik)
píju píjema píjem
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
píja píje
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
píju píjih píjih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
píjem píjema píji

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpi/ [ˈpi]
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Syllabification: pi

Noun edit

pi f (plural píes)

  1. pi; the Greek letter Π, π

Further reading edit

Swahili edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu [Term?].

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

pi

  1. Suffix used as an alternative to gani to more specifically say "which" of a known noun class.
    Anakaa nyumba ipi?Which house does he live in?

Inflection edit

See also edit

  • gani
  • -po: definite place indicator
  • -ko: indefinite place indicator
  • -mo: "inside" of a definite place indicator

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi n

  1. (mathematics) pi, a constant
  2. pi; a Greek letter

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

From English pee, the English name of the letter P/p.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: pi
  • IPA(key): /pi/, [pɪ]
  • Rhymes: -i

Noun edit

pi (Baybayin spelling ᜉᜒ)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p, in the Filipino alphabet.
    Synonyms: (in the Abakada alphabet) pa, (in the Abecedario) pe

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • pi”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

Tocharian B edit

Particle edit

pi

  1. really, indeed (used to emphasize questions and commands)

Totoro edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water

References edit

Tsafiki edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. water

References edit

Veps edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *pii, from Proto-Finno-Ugric *piŋe.

Noun edit

pi

  1. tooth (protrusion of certain objects, e.g. a saw, rake)

Inflection edit

Inflection of pi (inflection type 13/ma)
nominative sing. pi
genitive sing. pin
partitive sing. pid
partitive plur. pid
singular plural
nominative pi pid
accusative pin pid
genitive pin piden
partitive pid pid
essive-instructive pin pin
translative pikš pikš
inessive piš piš
elative pišpäi pišpäi
illative pihe pihe
adessive pil pil
ablative pilpäi pilpäi
allative pile pile
abessive pita pita
comitative pinke pidenke
prolative pidme pidme
approximative I pinno pidenno
approximative II pinnoks pidennoks
egressive pinnopäi pidennopäi
terminative I pihesai pihesai
terminative II pilesai pilesai
terminative III pissai
additive I pihepäi pihepäi
additive II pilepäi pilepäi

References edit

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “зуб”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi f (plural piau)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P.

Mutation edit

This word cannot be mutated.

See also edit

West Makian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

pi

  1. (ditransitive) to give
    Synonym: pula
    nipi de te(you) give me (some) tea!
  2. (ditransitive) to sell
    Synonym: pula

Conjugation edit

Conjugation of pi (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tepi mepi api
2nd person nepi fepi
3rd person inanimate ipi depi
animate
imperative nipi, pi fipi, pi

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[5], Pacific linguistics

Yoruba edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P.

See also edit

Zou edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *puj (augmentative marker).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

pi

  1. big

Noun edit

pi

  1. leader

Etymology 2 edit

From Northern Proto-Kuki-Chin *bii.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pi

  1. thatch

References edit

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, pages 40, 45